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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why would Dodge put a belt in rather then a chain.. Just curious.. about 10,000 km away from changing my belt.. Just wodering why a belt.. I owned a 2004 Suzuki Aero with a 4 banger..and it came with a chain..:knockout:
 

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I'm no expert but sounds like you answered your own question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm no expert but sounds like you answered your own question.
That was the first 4 cylinder I owned that came with a chain.. Just trying to figure out why Dodge would put in a belt.. rather then a chain..:knockout:
 

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I'm no expert but sounds like you answered your own question.
Well, I am an expert - I work for a company that manufacturers a rather large majority of the chain based timing systems for OEM's.

The main reason they put belts in? Guess. Cost. A rubber belt is cheaper than a chain system, and there are other engine design parameters that can be eliminated with a belt.

HOWEVER, more and more OE's are going to chain based systems, since more and more of the engines are OHC. With a chain based system, there's no need for "free running clearance" between the valves/piston (needed in a belt engine, so that when the belt breaks, it doesn't destroy the engine) which makes for better performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I am an expert - I work for a company that manufacturers a rather large majority of the chain based timing systems for OEM's.

The main reason they put belts in? Guess. Cost. A rubber belt is cheaper than a chain system, and there are other engine design parameters that can be eliminated with a belt.

HOWEVER, more and more OE's are going to chain based systems, since more and more of the engines are OHC. With a chain based system, there's no need for "free running clearance" between the valves/piston (needed in a belt engine, so that when the belt breaks, it doesn't destroy the engine) which makes for better performance.
Thank you very very much....:nervous s
 

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Anyways, Dodge is getting rid of their million v6 engines, and making one...and that one, from what CAP has told us, is going to be with a chain
 

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Well, I am an expert - I work for a company that manufacturers a rather large majority of the chain based timing systems for OEM's.

The main reason they put belts in? Guess. Cost. A rubber belt is cheaper than a chain system, and there are other engine design parameters that can be eliminated with a belt.
While I agree that cost is probably the #1 reason, it's not like belts don't have advantages. More efficient, less camshaft walk due to vibration, quieter, no lubrication system required so no power loss due to the chain running in oil.

It does seem that non-freewheeling engines (aka interference engines) are using chains these days. But to my knowledge the chain vs. belt debate has to be taken on an engine-by-engine basis, I don't think that one system is better than the other for all uses.
 

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While I agree that cost is probably the #1 reason, it's not like belts don't have advantages. More efficient, less camshaft walk due to vibration, quieter, no lubrication system required so no power loss due to the chain running in oil.
Well, I'll have to comment on the "quieter" (Noise is my specialty). That's not true with today's chains. It may have been true in the days of roller chain (which is the loudest chain on the market) but with inverted tooth chain, we are much queiter than a belt drive.

It does seem that non-freewheeling engines (aka interference engines) are using chains these days. But to my knowledge the chain vs. belt debate has to be taken on an engine-by-engine basis, I don't think that one system is better than the other for all uses.
Well, the other big hitter for the OE's is durability. Don't have to change a chain every 60k, 70, or 80k miles. It's built for the life of the engine.
 

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******* Charger, you have 175,000 KM on your Charger?

Thats when the belt is first scheduled to be replaced
 

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Well, I'll have to comment on the "quieter" (Noise is my specialty). That's not true with today's chains. It may have been true in the days of roller chain (which is the loudest chain on the market) but with inverted tooth chain, we are much queiter than a belt drive.

Well, the other big hitter for the OE's is durability. Don't have to change a chain every 60k, 70, or 80k miles. It's built for the life of the engine.
Good info. The march of technology continues.

Maybe the OE's are taking a longer view, but as I understood it, one of the reasons for using belts for cam timing was shifting some of the initial cost from the company to the consumer. Of couse that wouldn't hold true if the belt breaks during the warranty period and the company is still responsible for fixing it.

It always seems to me that there is a disparity in the designed belt life vs. real world anyway. I follow this on Buell motorcycles since they have a belt final drive. They have stuck with it, even though there have been some failures. The factory (with the help of Gates) has released improved belts, extended life belts, and lifetime belts, but they all seem to fail before they should. Or I should say they still have individual instances of premature failure. I guess many are getting the expected service life.

Same thing with the first-gen Talons/Eclipses. The DOHC engine had a 60k maintenance interval on the timing belt originally, after several failures this was changed to 30k.
 

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Well, I am an expert - I work for a company that manufacturers a rather large majority of the chain based timing systems for OEM's.

The main reason they put belts in? Guess. Cost. A rubber belt is cheaper than a chain system, and there are other engine design parameters that can be eliminated with a belt..

So get busy and make us an aftermarket chain set-up. :)
 

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I follow this on Buell motorcycles since they have a belt final drive. They have stuck with it, even though there have been some failures. The factory (with the help of Gates) has released improved belts, extended life belts, and lifetime belts, but they all seem to fail before they should. Or I should say they still have individual instances of premature failure. I guess many are getting the expected service life.

Yeah - I owned two Harleys, both of which were belt drive. Now, IMO, there's a good case for belts. Previous chain drives (roller chain) were noisy and messy - the rear wheel would get filthy when you lubed the chain. The final drive belt on these bike is very clean - yet being a noise guy, I could still hear the belt whine.
 

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Timing chaing Timing belt, its all the same!!

If your running and engine with the cam in the block, then chain is best
But if your running Overhead Cam or cams, then it really does not matter if its chain or belt.
The belt and idler require replacement on belt systems, the Chain guides need to be replaced along wit the chain as it streaches along with its tensioner. So Chain lasts no longer in OHC applications over the belt.

FYI, the 3.5 is an interference engine using a belt.
 
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