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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

This is primarily for the midwestern/eastern folk who have to deal with snow on a yearly basis... Cali guys, you can take a break!

Okay, so, this will be my first year runnin' in the snow with my Charger. I'm used to rear-wheel drive cars, so I know how those operate... My question is... I see a lot of people mentioning snow tires with this car. Seeing as how I have 6600 miles on my car, practically new tires.. Can I save myself the troulbe and not get snow tires this year, or is it a night and day difference in handling with the snow tires?

I figure I have about a month or two still before I need them, but I'd like to make sure I have them ready and on my car if it's a huge difference. If not, I'll wait through this year, and then get the rims/tires next spring/summer when I have the time...

Thanks!
 

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Depends on your local snowfall. Up here, you can forget about operating a large RWD car with snows all around... with our ESP and ABS, best to have snows all around instead of just in back like in the old days.

With a light well balanced car like a Honda Civic, you can get away with running all season tires for several winters in a row (and even then you can see a huge difference when running on snows) but on a car like the Charger, I wouldn't even consider it.

99% of the time it felt like my car was on dry pavement when driving on packed snow with Blizzaks on, it's that much of a difference.

Also, don't neglect the effect of cold on summer rubber... those tires get hard and don't grip anywhere near as well, as temperatures fall. So even in areas that don't get a lot of snowfall throughout winter, you gotta stay vigilant over the temperature-related drop in traction!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My RWD car before this one was a 1995 Ford Thunderbird with the 4.6. It had a worse weight distribution than the Charger and it just wasn't entirely right in the head...

I could tell a difference between new tires and old tires I'd have on there from one season to the next, but I went with the same set of tires from summer to winter and it seemed okay...

By your description a set of snow tires for this car, would be a definate advantage..?
 

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Again, it all depends on:

1) your local snow conditions

2) your acceptable margin of risk


There are many people who are able to drive year round with the summer tires on their cars in many regions. Some are okay to leave the car at home on bad days, some have very short distances, some are in locations where snowfall accumulation only occurs in less-frequently-travelled parking lots leaving the roads wet but usually snow-free... it is impossible to issue a blanket statement. Heck, I've seen online videos of the kinds of snowfall we'd consider a light dusting completely paralyze other towns. Only you will have the real feel for what it's like in your area.


Example: why stop at snow tires? Why did I not go with metal sudded tires as well? See my point? It's all relative to the region where the car will be driven. If you had good experiences with keeping your summer tires on a worse-balanced car throughout the year, then there should be no reason why you would want to do differently for this car, right? So I think you already knew the answer before asking the question... (or at least had your mind made up already...)


But to answer the last question: if the snow conditions warrant it, real snow tires make a big difference, on ANY car, end of story. Whether that big difference is actually needed for your local conditions, that's up to you to decide.
 
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