Charger Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just picked up an SLP Line Lock kit from Speedlogix in Florida and installed it. It is pretty simple but I thought I would do a short write up on the install. SLP is really good at putting the kit together. Writing instructions... well, let's just say it's not what they are the best at... :)

I also made some additions (not really chaanges) to the kit/install that I figured I'd share as well and perhaps it might give you guys some ideas.

To the install. This is not a difficult project by any means. The most difficult thing is mounting it. Because of the position of the solenoid, drilling the holes is not that easy. Other than that....it's a breeze. ONE NOTE: As with any project involving brake fluid, BE VERY CAREFUL. Prepare ahead of time with rags and containers to avoid getting any fluid on any painted surfaces. A little prep saves heartaches later. You will need to bleed the brakes, so again.... be prepared.

Step-by-step:

1) Locate the proportioning valve in the car. On the LX's (Challengers, Magnums, Chargers, 300's) it is behind the passenger side headlight, right next to the washer fluid refill. Clean off the top of the valve. Some cotton swabs and small scrap rags work well. Since you are opening the lines of the brake system, you want to avoid any dust in the system.



2) Remove the segment of brake line shown in the photo below. The shot below give you the overhead view, looking down onto the valve. Be sure to place a rag under the lines in the area to catch the drips of fluid you will have. Once you have the line out, a rag can be used to pick up the fluid that might come up from the valve.



3) Identify the two lines from the kit you will need to install. These basically divert the fluid through the solenoid. They are the "Solenoid to Prop Valve" and the "Master to Solenoid" lines.





5) Install the brass fittings onto the solenoid. There are two brass fittings provided with the kit. You will need to place some teflon tape on the fittings and then tighten the into the solenoid. Please refer to the final photo of the installed solenoid to see the fittings. You can see the teflon tape on it.

6) Loosely install the two lines by threading them lightly into the position with the solenoid. The "Solenoid to Prop Valve" line will come up from the top (brass side - and yes, the sticker will be upside down when positioned correctly) of the solenoid, between the washer fluid neck and the fuse box, and into the proportioning valve. The "Master to Solenoid" line will come from the bottom of the solenoid, between the washer neck and headlight area, and up into the line that ultimately routes over the radiator. Note that the brass fitting on the "Master to Solenoid" line goes to the solenoid. The other fitting (steel) goes to the line at the radiator bracket.



7) Once the lines are loosely in place, you can position solenoid to mark the pilot holes for the bolts. Once you have marked the position of the holes, remove the solenoid and lines.

8) At this stage, I put the "Master to Solenoid" line onto the lower side of the solenoid. I then tightend it completely. Don't worry about the position of the line because the solenoid rotates in the mount. That way when you go to install it the line can rotate into position easily. I did this because when you install it, you will find that tightening the lower line is next to impossible.

9) Drill the pilot holes for the screws to mount the solenoid. The pilot holes need to be big enough to allow the self tapping screws into position. I took the time to pre-thread the screws before having the solenoid in the way.

10) Mount the solenoid with the "Master to Solenoid" line already tight (Step 8) and rotate the solenoid to align the line to the car's line at the radiator bracket. Thread the line in loosely at the master line. Place the "Solenoid to Prop Valve" line and loosely thread it.

11) Once you are happy everything is lined up, screw down the solenoid and tighten the remaining brake line fittings. Use two wrenches to tighten the lines to not stress the solenoid or lines. The final shots of the installed solenoid and line routing are below.





12) Install the wire to the positve terminal on the fuse box. The wire is provided with the fuse in place. the length is perfect and connectors are good. I went to the top (closest to brass side of the solenoid) tab with positive. Tighten the positive post down again on the fuse box. (While this may seem obvious... trust me... I've seen it done)

13) Connect the long toggle switch wire to the lower connector on the solenoid. Route the wire around the front of the car and over to the hood release cable. I went out above the passenger headlight and the across under the radiator cover. The cable is shrouded so it look OEM. Not a big deal. I then followed the hood release cable all the way to the firewall. I went through the firewall at a wiring grommet. Easy. Once in place, I tie wrapped it all down.

14) Bleed the brakes. I did only the fronts as the rears are not touched.

At this point, you'll have the wire in the cabin of the car under the dash. The next part is the installation of the switch which is where I made some additions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
OK... so now the switch...

SLP recommends that you install the toggle at the shifter. I am not a big fan of modifying the interior with switches that would not look 100% stock or better than stock. For example, if I were to get, or have made, a Billet Technology custom control panel, that would be cool. But to drill into a plastic panel and put a $1.00 switch there does not work for me.

The SLP kit is a simple wiring job. Essentially, the 12V source is at the solenoid (from the fuse box positive) and all you need to do is switch on the ground side. When you turn on the switch you are closing the circuit to ground which then activates the solenoid. All you need a location with a ground source nearby. That's simple. So the supplies and work around.

Supplies:
1/4 inch femal mono plug (like what is used for a microphone or an electric guitar plug) about $2.00
Coiled mono plug cable. Male-to-Male. $14.00
Two "circuit boxes" from Radio Shack. Essentially a black box. $3.00 each
Plunger Style Switch. Also called an "instantaneous" switch. $2.00
Toggle switch supplied with the SLP kit

15) I routed the wire (coming from the solenoid) in under the driver's side and into the center console. I went under the center console and untimately into the storage area under the center armrest.

16) In the 2010 Charger (don't know that they are all the same but I assume so) there is a rubber base inside the storage. I removed that to find there are four bolts holding down the center armrest. I removed these and the center console is loose enough at the rear to route the wire up and into the center storage from underneath.

17) Setup the plug to recieve the switches. I took a female mono 1/4 plug from Radio Shack (you will see what the plug looks like in the photos below) and soldered the two wires to it. It makes no difference which pole each goes to. One wire will then go to the ground source, a bolt in the console in my case, and the other wire is the one that runs back to the solenoid.



18) Bolt the ground wire to the bolt that holds down the center console. The finished install shot is below. I then put the rubber console storage tray back in keeping the plug out. (if I want to really hide it, I could simply put it under the tray after each race) As a final safety, I got a 1/4 male plug that has nothing wired to it. Basically a dummy plug. I place that in the female plug as a safety. Basically, it will assure I never activate the solenoid with somethign stupid like a pin or paper clip getting in there. Overkill... but I prefer to overkill.



19) Build the two switches. This is simple and the boxes just make the final look clean. I took the coiled mono cable ($14.00 at Radio Shack) and cut it in half giving me 2 three foot coiled cables with a male plug at one end. The cut end will have two conductors. A ground (sheild and it is around the center conductor) and the center conductor.

20) Drill two holes in the boxes. One for the wire (small) and one for the switch (1/2 inch in my case but it will depend on the switch). Run the cut end of the coiled cable into the box giving yourself enough slack to work with.

21) Connect to the switches. I soldered the wires, but each switch is different. Bottom line, at the cut end I simply connect the two wires to each pole of the switches (toggle or plunger). Tuck everything into the box (should be easy) and close it.





These are the two switches I made. I can use either one and simply plug in what I prefer. The plunger style is easier so I will likely use it.

At this point, I have the connections in the consoles done with crimp style connectors and taped. Once I am 100% sure that I am good with this, I will solder the connections (it's only two) and heatshrink everything.

Now I have to go and test the setup at the track....... and yes.... I already tried it in an undisclosed secret location... LOL...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Nice job and write up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,140 Posts
Very NICE!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Was at the track yesterday.... Line Lock was awesome.... Far easier for the burn outs... I tried both switches... the plunger was easier.... each has it's positives and negatives. Basically comes down to the track rythm. If they have you cycling through fast, the plunger is great because you don't have to be holding it long. If he's slow the switch is great cause you can simply leave it engaged.

In either case release the switch/toggle once you get some smoke....which doesn't take too much... LOL... and it rolls dead straight out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I found your thread through a Google search.
I own a Challenger but have a young friend of mine with an '07 Charger that we put this linelock on and when it didn't work I went looking for info
Thanks for posting and I'm sure a bundle of people learn the hard way that the solenoid is in upside down because we look at the sticker on it instead of paying attention to the instructions
As soon as I read your write up I knew what I did wrong
Thanks again... Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Glad I was able to help despite the photo links being bad. I'll see if I can update the links.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hey man, nice write-up. I'm ordering one now and could really use those pics if ya get the chance to update the links! thanks again man!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Had not gotten to this one. I just updated all the links for the photos so that they show up and are not dead links.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top