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I have a 2013 Police Pursuit. Are there any secret things about the cars I should or could look for? You know, like hiding places? While cleaning the trunk out, I found out the Battery is in there, WOW. I love a good mystery. Do they really detune the cars before selling them off? Are the police computers different on their cars?
Be patient with me, I'm old (66) and need to stay active 馃ぃ 馃殧
 

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Pursuits have the exact same power output as the R/T.

Only addition in tuning is the much higher speed govner (typically 158mph with a option for 138mpg gov for some departments)


Pursuits get larger rear brakes, HD suspension, Load leveling shocks in rear, 220 amp alternator (wanna say stock is 160/180 amps?) Engine Oil cooling, Dual Radiator Fans, additional wiring as well as thicker main power harness.

There are a few smaller things but I got to head out. But here is my Pursuit!
 

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Additional cooling and heavy duty suspension is enough to make me interested however I've always neen told the interiors are weird and also was informed that pursuit vehickes tend to develope electrical gremlins quite commonly.

No idea if any of this is true, I don't even know how or where people buy these.
 

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Pursuits get a bad rep, but honestly nothing plagues them that civilians do not gt as well. The higher usage rate on Pursuits just make things happen sooner.

Far as lack of maintenance, that is mostly BS. GSP had my car before hand and looking back on history looks like every 6K miles she was serviced on the dot. Most departments do maintian thier eheicles. Finding a car that was a assigned car/ take home is the Key. These were taken better care of in the long run. That and State Patrol cars vs ciyy cars due to actually being driven instead of putzing around city.
 

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Yes, too many people believe police cars are better/hotter than civilian models. They are, because of the vinyl seats, poor maintenance, and over-use...鈥.
I've had good experiences buying ex-police vehicles, they usually give you repair records and they were over maintained... at least in CT. I'm sure some agencies don't maintain their cars.
 

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I started out driving Ply Satellites and Dodge Polara's and exited the profession driving the CV before Dodge re-entered the police market.

Our CV units were maintained under service contracts and warranty for 5 years/100,000 miles as part of the fleet buy. Granted this is before Dodge resumed partnership with law enforcement but it is still very common today no matter what make an agency uses.

Most of the cars we decomissioned occured at the 5- years point before reaching mileage. The key force in replacement and disposition of the units was the County Commission. . Best of the used cars were handed down to other county or city departments if they wanted them. Some were used as trade-in to the dealership under a new fleet purchase, and others were auctioned off and picked u by private refurb companies for resale to budget strapped municipalities. And quite a few were bought by private parties like many forum members have bought them from auction or from a private party

In no circumstance would a vehicle be in service for more than 125,000 miles.

Very often we sat parked in the car idling 2 hours a shift with some cars used 2 shifts. When you factor overtime the cars were in use 20 of those 24 hours. So I wouldn't take oil changes as gospel as to how well a car was maintained in that regard then or now. Just saying.

RSA tires took a beating. If we picked up a nail or shard of metal it was repaired with a uni-seal patch and restricted to 85 mph if a new tire was not available. In one ear and out the other because no one respected the policy. So the tires on ex cop cars will likely have repairs. Just saying.

We had recommendations to flush transmissions every 30,000 miles. Servicing looks good on record but most people would cringe at flushing a transmission. And it's probably not a standard practice today on modern cars. Therefore transmissions are less likely to have any service done at all.
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Suspensions were well used (regularly abused over curbs, medians, dips and speed bumps). Think the Charger has a multitude if brakes and suspension set ups. Research the CV configurations. More than once, a unit was repaired using a standard CV interchangeable component when it shouldn't have. I'm not sure if that's a concern with the Charger.

I doubt driving skills and habits of LE are much different today than my time, nor the maintenance habits. Today, service contracts and warranties are more a part of the fleet purchase if Dodge or Ford wants to do business.

Some smaller localities might use their own local gas stations for servicing and small repairs. And very often at State level, the vehicle is issued to the patrolman or trooper with a $1000 annual budget for routine service because they keep it garaged at home. That pride in ownership is why many of you see used cop cars in good condition.

What I will very clearly say is the quality and robustness of the Dodge is surprisingly good and anyone owning a used pursuit should have many more miles of service for general highway driving.
 
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