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Discussion Starter #1
2007 R/T 5.7L

I followed the directions in the how to do everything thread on radiator replacement. Now the coolant in the reservoir is boiling and the car is not getting any cooling. I'm flustered. More info follows:

I recently had the cooling fan assembly problem where the fan disintegrated itself. In the process the blades damaged the radiator. So I replaced both. Everything went smoothly until I added coolant. I added a bit of coolant in the reservoir, but it never went down. Ran the car at idle for about 20 minutes, and it started to overheat. I'm confident the thermostat is working because it was replaced about 2 months ago at the dealership.

Do I need to get the air out of the radiator somehow? I read the instructions here on how to bleed it, but I don't quite get them. The upper radiator hose gets hot, so the thermostat is opening properly right?

I signed up just for this. Please help me. I'm freaked out that I did something wrong. I even made sure that I had removed the shipping plugs on both radiator inlets.
 

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PER the Service Manual

NOTE: Cooling system fill procedure is critical to overall cooling system performance.
1. Close radiator drain petcokc. Hand tighten only.
2. Install engine block drain plugs, if removed. Coat the threads with MoparT Thread Sealant with Teflon.
WARNING: When installing drain hose to air bleed valve, route hose away from accessory drive belts,
accessory drive pulleys, and electric cooling fan motors.
NOTE: It may be necessary to install a bleed fitting on the 5.7L engine.
3. Attach a 1.5 - 2 m (4 - 6 ft.) long 6.35 mm (1/4 inch.) ID clear hose to bleeder fitting
² Bleed Valve Location (2.7L): Located on the water outlet connector at the front of engine.
² Bleed Valve Location (3.5L): Located on the lower intake manifold, left of center and below the upper intake
plenum.
² Plug Location (5.7L/6.1L): Located on the front of the water outlet housing at the front of engine.
4. Route hose (2) away from the accessory drive belt, drive pulleys and electric cooling fan. Place the other end of
hose (2) into a clean container. The hose will prevent coolant from contacting the accessory drive belt when
bleeding the system during the refilling operation.
NOTE: It is imperative that the cooling system air bleed valve be opened before any coolant is added to the
cooling system. Failure to open the bleed valve first will result in an incomplete fill of the system.
5. 5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install a threaded and barbed fitting (1/4 - 18 npt) into water pump housing.
6. Attach Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel to pressure bottle filler neck.
7. Using hose pinch-off pliers, pinch overflow hose (3) that connects between the two chambers of the coolant
bottle (2).
8. Open bleed fitting.
CAUTION: Do not mix coolants. If coolant is used other than specified, a reduction in corrosion protection
will occur.
9. Pour the antifreeze mixture (Refer to LUBRICATION & MAINTENANCE/FLUID TYPES - DESCRIPTION) into the
larger section of Filling Aid Funnel (the smaller section of funnel is to allow air to escape). For system capacity,
(Refer to 7 - COOLING - SPECIFICATIONS).
10. Slowly fill the cooling system until a steady stream of coolant flows from the hose attached to the bleed valve.
11. Close the bleed valve and continue filling system to the top of the Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel.
12. Remove pinch-off pliers from overflow hose.
13. Allow the coolant in Filling Funnel to drain into overflow chamber of the pressure bottle.
14. Remove Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel. Install cap on coolant pressure bottle.
15. Remove hose from bleed valve.
16. 5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install fitting into thermostat housing. Coat the threads with MoparT Thread Sealant with
Teflon.
17. Start engine and run at 1500 - 2000 RPM for 30 minutes.
NOTE: The engine cooling system will push any remaining air into the coolant bottle within about an hour
of normal driving. As a result, a drop in coolant level in the pressure bottle may occur. If the engine cooling
system overheats and pushes coolant into the overflow side of the coolant bottle, this coolant will be
sucked back into the cooling system ONLY IF THE PRESSURE CAP IS LEFT ON THE BOTTLE. Removing
the pressure cap breaks the vacuum path between the two bottle sections and the coolant will not return to
cooling system.
18. Shut off engine allow it to cool down for 30 minutes. This permits coolant to be drawn into the pressure chamber.
19. With engine COLD, observe coolant level in pressure chamber. Coolant level should be within MIN and MAX
marks. Adjust coolant level as necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the quick reply. I suspected that was the problem, but honestly I've never done the bleeding part before. Is there a picture somewhere on here of the bleeder screw?

I read the thread you posted. Is there some sort of kit I can buy to connect a line into that bleeder plug or what parts would I need?

Edit: I found the bleeder screw, and I moved it a fraction, just to make sure I could get it out due to age. What is the size fitting I should thread into there?
 

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You need a spill free funnel. They are invaluable if you do your own radiator flushes. I've had one for several years and they work great.


I found a nice little how to video for you as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks for the assistance all. Some of it I still had to figure out on my own. I was really up the creek on this one, as my motorcycle recently died (battery issue), and this is the wife's Charger. That means we need two cars every day and were down to one. I was under the gun to get this fixed.

A summary of my lessons learned for other folks who try this for the first time:

1) Finding the bleeder fitting to thread into the hole where the bleeder plug is easy. Finding the right tubing that will stay attached and not melt is slightly more difficult. I had issues getting this right until eventually I just rigged a plastic funnel to catch the air/steam/coolant mix coming out of the bleeder fitting and directed it down some PVC pipe I had on hand into a catch bin underneath. It was the only way to keep most of the mixture from winding up on the accessory belt or in the cooling fan. It was jury-rigged as all hell with some zip ties and vice grips to keep it from moving into the pulleys or fan shround, and equally dangerous; I don't recommend it but it worked. Seems to me like any conventional plastic tubing you buy is going to melt or not stay in.

This is what I used, but I don't recommend it unless it's all you have:
Dorman Help! Radiator Drain c o c k Part #61104
http://www.pepboys.com/product/details/1079869/00757

Better yet, find the actual Dodge tool that the mechanics use. I was pressed for time, so I could not.

2) I could not find the spill free funnel on short notice. I made do without, but it took me longer than necessary, as I had to keep stopping the process to fill up the reservoir to make sure there was enough coolant getting into the system and not air.

Remaining questions:
I did not drain the engine block, and it wasn't that long ago that I had it serviced to drain and flush the cooling system. The coolant I put in it is not the same brand, so now there is a mix based on the coolant in the block. Should I be concerned about this?

I put the bleeder plug back in, but should I take it out and use some kind of teflon tape or similar material on it?

I ran the car for about 20 minutes after the bleeding process was complete, and the temperature was constant at the exact place it should be. After it cooled down, I hosed off the front of the car and accesory belt while being careful not to get water into the coil packs, fuse block or other electrical parts. Should I be concerned about any residual fluid anywhere or is that enough?

Later on tonight after everything was done, I took it out on the road and drove it at varying speeds (town, interstate, etc) with the A/C maxed out with an outside temperature of 90 degrees. The temp gauge never moved a fraction from a hair to the left of dead center. Unless I wake up with a coolant leak (in case I did not hook something back up right because I'm an idiot), I would think I am good, yes?
 

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Remaining questions:
I did not drain the engine block, and it wasn't that long ago that I had it serviced to drain and flush the cooling system. The coolant I put in it is not the same brand, so now there is a mix based on the coolant in the block. Should I be concerned about this?

As long as it the correct type for the car, no issue mixing brands

I put the bleeder plug back in, but should I take it out and use some kind of teflon tape or similar material on it?

It shouldn't be necessary unless you see leaking around the plug.

I ran the car for about 20 minutes after the bleeding process was complete, and the temperature was constant at the exact place it should be. After it cooled down, I hosed off the front of the car and accesory belt while being careful not to get water into the coil packs, fuse block or other electrical parts. Should I be concerned about any residual fluid anywhere or is that enough?

Sounds like you did it right. Any remaining fluid won't cause any problem.

Later on tonight after everything was done, I took it out on the road and drove it at varying speeds (town, interstate, etc) with the A/C maxed out with an outside temperature of 90 degrees. The temp gauge never moved a fraction from a hair to the left of dead center. Unless I wake up with a coolant leak (in case I did not hook something back up right because I'm an idiot), I would think I am good, yes?

Yes! :bigthumb:
Glad you got it worked out :smile2:
 

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Funnels and tubes and petcokcs OH MY! You don't need the drain tubing and special bleeder fitting to purge the air from the coolant system. Simply loosen the bleeder plug a few turns and slowly fill the reservoir tank until coolant begins to weep out around the bleeder plug. Tighten the plug and continue filling the reservoir to the COLD fill line. Start the car and make sure coolant is freely flowing back to the reservoir in the small return line on the back. When that is going good, put the cap on the reservoir and let the engine heat up until the T-stat opens. Shut the car off and let the engine cool a bit and check the coolant level again. Top off if necessary. 95% of the air should be out of the system by now. Check it for the next few days and add coolant as the rest of the air makes its way to the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the follow up rodneyiii, I missed your post. Would have been nice to know that before I did things the hard way, LOL, but that's how you learn I guess. On the upside, I have had no problems for two months since getting the air out of the system. Car runs fine, temperature is rock steady with no leaks in the system. Coolant level has been steady as well. Thanks everyone for your help.:beerchug:
 
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