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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not to patiently waiting for my Black R/T to come in and have been trying to find the answer to the following. I did not get the performance package and am wondering if the back end has a limited slip differential or just the traction control that is built in. I really don't like electronic traction control and would much prefer the limited slip diff. I can not find anywhere if that is the case. Can anyone help out?

Like a kid one month before Christmas

Lammy
 

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lammy said:
I am not to patiently waiting for my Black R/T to come in and have been trying to find the answer to the following. I did not get the performance package and am wondering if the back end has a limited slip differential or just the traction control that is built in. I really don't like electronic traction control and would much prefer the limited slip diff. I can not find anywhere if that is the case. Can anyone help out?

Like a kid one month before Christmas

Lammy
No LSD on the R/T.
 

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no posi on the srt-8 either.think ill wait for the 07 modles they just mite add posi but dought it.
 

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why on earth would these V8 cars have no Limited Slip standard let alone optional. All Mustang GTs do have it standard if I am not mistaken (all LX 5.0 and GT Fox cars did have it standard). The GTO has it standard. All V8 Firebirds and Camaros had it standard. The 94-96 Impala SS had 3.08 8.5" Posi (my car) standard. Why in heaven's name would these not have it?! The Mercury Marauder had it standard (8.8" 3.55:1). What's up with the 300Cs then? Tell me they have it?! I know the Cadillac CTS V-Series does; I've heard it in action on a wet ground. All other V-Series Caddys must have it too standard. A 4000lb car with 390lbs-ft. of torque needs it; it's not a luxury to have it.
 

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:embarrese

Can someone please explain (or link me to an explanation) what the slip differential is and does? I take it it's because the car is RWD and has a lot of power, so I'd also furthermore guess that it's only on the SRT-8 because the R/T can get away without it, because of it's already distributed weight and traction control.

Am I even lukewarm here?
 

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epoch said:
:embarrese

Can someone please explain (or link me to an explanation) what the slip differential is and does? I take it it's because the car is RWD and has a lot of power, so I'd also furthermore guess that it's only on the SRT-8 because the R/T can get away without it, because of it's already distributed weight and traction control.

Am I even lukewarm here?
here is a good site with some basic info for you... just ignore the sales pitch...

general differential info

Limited slip info
 

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MoparG said:
why on earth would these V8 cars have no Limited Slip standard let alone optional. All Mustang GTs do have it standard if I am not mistaken (all LX 5.0 and GT Fox cars did have it standard). The GTO has it standard. All V8 Firebirds and Camaros had it standard. The 94-96 Impala SS had 3.08 8.5" Posi (my car) standard. Why in heaven's name would these not have it?! The Mercury Marauder had it standard (8.8" 3.55:1). What's up with the 300Cs then? Tell me they have it?! I know the Cadillac CTS V-Series does; I've heard it in action on a wet ground. All other V-Series Caddys must have it too standard. A 4000lb car with 390lbs-ft. of torque needs it; it's not a luxury to have it.
I disagree. The only purpose for it is the drag strip. Driving in the rain or in snow, a limited slip differential makes the car more dangerous because it is more likely you'll lose the rear end. With an open differential, at least you can count on 3 tires always having traction.
 

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RE: Limited Slip (MOPAR SURE GRIP DXXX IT)

learn how to drive SOLDIER! (don't take this the wrong way, but once I test drove a 1977 Chevrolet Bel Air with an open differential and the right wheel would spin endlessly in the rain! How embarasing).

Rain is when I yearn for Limited Slip the most; just know how to tap or ease the pedal. Treat the car in the rain gently like it's your precious young daughter ready to soon go out in the real world (be a good role model) unless you want do be like Bo and Luke Duke and that is fine too and you'll find that during such spirited manouvers LSD can be very rewarding as the slide will be PREDICTABLE and you won't end up wrapped around a pole like some non-posi Chevelles did.

With just enough throttle tip-in, you'll hear the LSD shudder and grab the wet asphalt like a Mummy does her newborn baby. Back in the day this WAS the TRACTION CONTROL.
 

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I agree with MG, there is NOTHING wrong with limited slip in the rain or snow. Used properly. Where this myth comes from is folks who don't know and anticipate what the car is going to do. If you can't predict when the power will be transferred, it can catch you by surprise. It's not hard, when the first one slips a hair, then it will catch and drive both.

The key, as almost always, is driver knowledge and training. I quite often drive my wifes 99 Blazer is 2wd mode in snow, just to keep my skills sharp, since we don't get a whole lot of snow here. She was baffled at first with what seemed to be my cavaliar attitude towards having the back end loose, but has since come to understand its under control, and I can bring the back end out of that slide with a flick of the wrist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It looks like I started quite the debate about Limited Slip Diffs. I have one in my current vehicle and like GLH stated it is a skill to control. I am very accustomed to the way that the back end will behave based on the throttle input that I give. I was hoping for the same type of experience with the Charger. All that power would be fun to harnes.
 

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Re: Limited Slip (MOPAR SURE GRIP DXXX IT)

MoparG said:
learn how to drive SOLDIER! (don't take this the wrong way, but once I test drove a 1977 Chevrolet Bel Air with an open differential and the right wheel would spin endlessly in the rain! How embarasing).
That quote indicates to me that you're the one in need of improved driving skills, or at least were at the time.

I don't profess to be the expert on limited slip rear driving because I've never owned a car with one, although I have driven many. I never had a problem driving my Chrysler in the snow, though. I lived in Denver for a year and drove it in as much as a foot of snow without incident, and it's a peg leg.
 

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That Bel Air was an 11 year old car at the time and was an ex-cab (another words the shocks were shot) the car swayed too much which magnified the uni-traction characteristics. I used this magnified example to show the effects of single traction. I've owned cars that had single traction and converted them to posi (a 7.5" uni will become a 7.625" posi for example which are the units used in F-body V8 LT1/LS1 Camaro/Firebirds and certain S10s).

Try driving up hills in rainy or even foggy San Francisco with UniTrac; it's not going to happen.

You know you can say what you want about my driving skills but I have no trouble saying to you that if you want experience driving POSI then you have to learn sometime however this doesn't reflect directly on your comment because you were refering to my time driving non-posi unit so I won't take offense. I'd hate to see what you'd have to say if I did a few posi fishtails but perhaps you would have the opposite say such as the impressive smoothness of the slick and predictable slide I muster sliding my 94 Impala 3.08:1 8.5" Posi around a corner in the rain with column shifter in 2nd which overides the 4L60-Es torque converter's decision to uphshift or downshift; butter smooth with the back end out one end for a 1/4 block by modulating the throttle input.

Oh the time I bought a 1978 Dodge Monaco 4dr which was originally sold from Century Motors in Winnipeg complete with FULL WINTER PACKAGE. Yes, folks, a true WINTER CAR ordered as such with a very large block heater AC loom attached to one of the square grilles (think Rosco's Monaco) powering on the other end no less than 4 things: 2 heated block plugs, 1 battery warmer complete with hug-the-battery electric blanket and an AutoPar cabin heater mounted in the passenger side kick panel. Oh and ofcourse the all impotant item required for such a snowy region which sees dumps of snow for months and -40 degrees C/F (yes the same number for both units of measure), a 9 1/4" 3.21:1 SureGrip Limited Slip differential. I drove that car in the snow for quite some time before I decided to restore it. She would cut through snow like hot knife through butter. There was no where she couldn't go in a snow blizzard. I drove her on 5 hour journeys through canyons and mountain tops with nothing but me and snow/sand/salt splashing semis next to me and the SureGrip grabbed with might. Anything single traction would not have been able to last 5 minutes with one wheel spinning and GOING NOWHERE.

I remember the time it poured snow in Vancouver with lightning bolts. Intercity traffic was locked in accidents and stalled cars everywhere including front wheeldrivers. I hopped into my MoPar with confidence and proceded down very steep grades that would normally be blocked off. Hitting my police duty brakes (was not a police car but was ordered to have winter HD specs which seemed to include such niceties as double serpentine belts, suspension to handle the SureGrip, etc.) on and off slowly down the hill yielded me to safety. At one other point after passing plenty of stuck SUVs, the sheer icy terrain permitted me to go close to a curb with millimeters to spare. Making love to my LSD I eventually nudged my way out of the curb's dead end and proceeded once again (remember in these instances a bag of kitty litter in the trunk helps wonders if you have a land yaght from the 70's with no weight pushing down on the axle unlike todays RWD cars with exception to Ford Panther-bodies) which have plenty of strategic weight in the C-pillar zone and back resting over the axle). I got stuck one more time before arriving home (for a minute) and thanks to posi spining them up at both ends,it didn't take the Monaco long to grasp the slush on both sides and spit it out like shark's teeth biting jelly.

At one time I had a 1978 Malibu on the road with 7.5" UniTrac and it started to snow buckets and I needed to be at my workplace a 6:00AM and there had been no snowplows yet or traffic to de-virginize the freeways and roadways. I borrowed my girlfirends '95 Camaro Z28 which I optioned with the 3.23:1 7.625" Posi (as opposed to the 2.73:1 version). I said to her that I needed get to work on time and the single trac 'Bu with P235/7014s was going to be a nightmare. I got the Z that morning and drove through all the fresh thick snow (with stock Goodyear Eagle RS-A all-seasons) and laughing with excitement the whole way with the ASR (trac control) OFF. I felt like Dr.Zhivago enjoying a perfect trip without flaw going home. Once on a seperate occasion the Z got stuck in a snow pile. I had told my girlfriend how useless the Bosch 5 traction control would be of she got stuck like we had that one night. Ofcourse all the Bosch trac control does is pulse the brakes and retard the LT1's timing; all useless in this situation. All that happened with the ASR was that it retarded the timing to practically nothing;ever heard an LT1 do nothing in the RPM range when hitting the pedal? Try getting stuck in the snow. I showed her these effects that I had told her about that could happen and then I switched off the TRAC CONTROL and rocked the 4L60-E tranny back and forth 4 or 5 times and voila, POSI comes through again; I love predictability. If that was a open diff, you'd either be calling AAA or be slaving away with salt, flexible tire ramps, shoveling, etc. it's like having 1wd!


Many times with my LSD cars if I was in a tight spot and parked on tons of snow, I would apply this technique. Instead of putting the car in reverse (such as was this example that I was in at a friends driveway with car part in front of me) and letting the posi's dual grip push the car slowly to one side (like towards a concrete fence in my case!),I pumped the gas pedal about 12 times in reverse but only 1/8 away down each time (ah the glory of a TORQUE DOWN LOW V8) and a few seconds later I was clear of the potential quarter panel damage of the Z car's pose to dual trac into the concrete. Hence if you know how to utilize and master LSD you will feel free like a bird and buy nothing but LSD cars!

The United States Air Force has about 20 at any one time REAR WHEEL DRIVE POSITRACTION cars designated to be used as U2 SpyPlane chase vehicles in California and in Europe (and sometimes in times of war in other places of the world through sandstorms, etc.). These vehicles must meet 2 standards. Be very torqey off the line and be able to accelerate radically fast to speeds in excess of 100MPH in order to chase a U2 SpyPlane on take off or when landing (reason is because these aircraft are very long and wide and are large gliders and can not land without on-the-ground data being transmitteed back by another U2 pilot behind the wheel of one of these chase cars chasing behind sometimes closing in at about 60ft. And yes in parts of Europe where these bases are it is rainy and cloudy with plenty of mist on the ground. Such cars have included the new 6.0L Pontiac GTO, late 90's Camaro LS1 cars, Fox-platform Mustang Interceptors, non-stock El Caminos (with big blocks) and Ford Station wagons with big blocks. No room for error, you wipe out and you could lose a plane and human lives. Needless to say, handling a posi with a torquey V8 accelerating in the wet at speeds equaling the aircraft you are chasing suggests that you can indeed get to your school, store, date, bank, beach or wherever you are going in rain, sleet, snow or mud in your posi trac vehicle.
 

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MoparG said:
The United States Air Force has about 20 at any one time REAR WHEEL DRIVE POSITRACTION cars designated to be used as U2 SpyPlane chase vehicles in California and in Europe (and sometimes in times of war in other places of the world through sandstorms, etc.). Such cars have included the new 6.0L Pontiac GTO, late 90's Camaro LS1 cars, Fox-platform Mustang Interceptors, non-stock El Caminos (with big blocks) and Ford Station wagons with big blocks. No room for error, you wipe out and you could lose a plane and human lives. Needless to say, handling a posi with a torquey V8 accelerating in the wet at speeds equaling the aircraft you are chasing suggests that you can indeed get to your school, store, date, bank, beach or wherever you are going in rain, sleet, snow or mud in your posi trac vehicle.

Hey, I know those cars:) Last time I saw some it was a matched set, 1 Stang and 1 Camaro:)

Moffet tower to the NASA [email protected] investigating the ozone layer in the late 80s

"Nasa flight, you are cleared to 60 thousand feet, have a nice day sir"

Made us with our wimpy 28 thousand foot ceiling P-3C feel inadequate. So we went and made dinner in the oven in the dinette and felt better :)
 

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Here's the Camaro: http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123009869
The next time one is in doubt as to which posi/RWD ohv V8 lay-out to consider in order to get you from 0-100mph with stability and tact, look no further than the USAF.

I bet they are closely looking at the Charger SRT8 model (if it weren't already for the GTO) if it comes with LSD ofcourse. The one problem is that the USAD always uses American cars and even though the GTO is made in Australia, it is still a GM car and GM is an American company. The Charger, although made in North America, is made by a German company now.
 

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Am I reading this right? We have this awesome $30k performance machine (Charger R/T) and it does NOT have a limited slip diff even OPTIONAL?

If you want to drag race, you need both tires driving the car, not one. Why did D/C do this (not offer it even as an option) if this is true????

Sheesh!
 

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These cars do have a limited slip system. It uses the traction control to keep both rear tires spinning at the same speed. By applying brake to the tire with the least amount of traction the system can divide the torque equally between the rear tires. This works great for drag strip performance because the rear end doesn't have the extra rotating mass of an LSD unit.
The only draw back is the brakes can only compensate so much for traction. So it?s difficult to Drift or do a good donut.
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And judging by my ride with a Skip Barber guy, the SRT-8 has NO problem both launching hard and doing huge smoky, tire spinning turns. I would not borrow trouble, wait, test drive, and see for yourself.
 
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