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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

It's been a while since I've posted or even visited these forums after purchasing a Dart last year, however the Dart totally sucks and I'm looking to get back into the Charger game!

I have a good deal on a 2011 Charger Pursuit V6 with only 54000 miles. It was a duty car and most likely saw some rough service in it's three years of life.

I've searched the forums and have come up with a list of questions:

1 - Is there a way to add aftermarket SD storage to the factory radio? Should I buy a "metra" kit to get the most out of the radio system?

2 - What sort of problems can I expect with a pursuit charger under medium/heavy use? What should I basically change out or "fix" when and if I buy it?

3 - Is there firmer shift tuning for this model? Different from standard?

Thanks!
 

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To help you figure out whats best,
1. I think you would be able to exchange an OEM radio for a better OEM radio, however the police car is a base model so you will not be able to step up to a high end radio. To improve the radio just go after market. Metra makes good kits so does AMI, and scoche. Some kits fit or have a better finish than others. I say that from my experience doing car audio installs.
2.I would not change out anything. If anything you would just need to do a complete service on the car. Change or flush all fluids, oil, trans, diff, radiator, power steering. Change the fuel filter (departments use cheap gas), Spark plugs, all filters (oil, trans, fuel, air intake, Cabin if equipped), change the belt out. Remember all the fleet cars have scheduled maintenance but they don't always get in on time. Most departments are good about caring for the vehicles some are not. But doing a full tune up like that will get things at a good base line.
Take the car to the dealer and have them check for any recalls that need to be done on the car as well. Keep in mind that police cars idle a lot so there will be more engine hours on the motor. Ford for example says 1 engine hours is like 33 miles on the car. I don't know what the dodge is.
3. The trans may be the same as the regular v6. I only know that the center shifter was relocated to the column for the police versions. But I would imagine there would be some differences. The car might idle higher to run all the extra electronic equipment police use. Beyond that good luck with the car.
 

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I don't know man, cops leave their car idling all the time, a/c almost always on. Like FreeAgent said, 54,000 miles on a cop car is not the same as on a civilian vehicle. And the car ma have been used for more than one shift, depending on the department.

That being said, I believe the police v6 has the old 5 speed tyranny, so you may have good luck finding a tuner.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. Definitely looking at a tuner or supercharger (Tidalwave) since this is a 3.6 with a 5-speed and can handle torque and hp increases.

I know the pursuits are usually 5.7's but in Maine they order the cheaper ones and favor gas mileage over power. Even the new Taurus's are the standard 3.5, non-ecoboost models.
 

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I'd certainly recommend looking at the hour meter on the EVIC. Many patrol cars spend hours idling. I turn mine off if I'm not in it, but I see a lot of guys/gals from a lot of departments that leave it running with the heat or air on. Not only that but even I leave it running/idling if I'm in it while stationary (patrol, paperwork, etc). If you figure an average speed of 30 mph to allow for stop/go traffic, and city use, you'd have about 1800 hours on a car with 54,000 miles (1 mile at 30mph = 2 mintures per mile. 108K minutes divided by 60 minutes per hour). Obviously that's a ballpark, though now that I think about it, it's close to Ford's 33 miles per hour figure. Anyway the point is a patrol car with those miles and more than 2000 hours on it sat idle a lot (which many of them do).

I don't know if all Pursuits have it, but the suspension and brakes should be more robust than a standard Charge. Similarly they'll likely have a larger alternator, and transmission cooler.

Things to look for:
Holes in the roof, deck lid, or pillars where wires were run to a light bar, antenna, etc. Holes in the floor, B-pillar, and/or roof where a protective barrier was mounted.
Condition of the seat and steering wheel. We've got a lot of crap on our belt/body so seats and stuff tend to get scratched, scuffed, and gouged. Perfect example is the B-pillar of my patrol car (which has under 20K on it right now) has tears in the fabric on the B-pillar where I apparently hit my belt regularly when I get in/out. Seats often end up in pretty rough shape over time for the same reason.
Check the suspension components. Yes they're likely beefier, but they carry a lot of extra weight with all the gear and tend to wear quickly.
As mentioned, do a tune up. Most patrol cars do get service as mentioned, but some departments aren't exactly prompt about it. Other's, like the patrol, will write us up if we're late on it so it's a crap shoot of which one you get it from.
If you buy it, scrub the living he** out of the back seat. There are some nasty people that get put back there. Expect blood, spit, urine, feces, dope residue, etc back there. Hit it with a black light before you scrub it and you'll probably run for the hills.

That's about all I can think of off the top of my head. I'm sure I'm missing some things, but if I think of any, I'll update with it. If you have any specific questions though, let me know.
 

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If you have problem with Tension Struts, make sure you get the newer Police version that has a solid bushing, part #68234847AA . The Tension Strut Bushings have been a problem.

I never checked my engine hour meter because it's not going to change anything once you have purchased the car, so why worry. I would go by mileage now for your oil changes being that it's not going to be in Police use anymore. We have V6's and V8's with three times those miles, and I'm sure three times the engine hours, and they still run great. Enjoy it.
 

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......I never checked my engine hour meter because it's not going to change anything once you have purchased the car, so why worry.......
The point isn't to worry about it, or check it regularly. The point is to take idle hours into consideration along with actual displayed miles when buying it.

For example: Regardless of their reasons, say a buyer doesn't want to buy a car with 100,000 miles (just to use an even number). Let's say they find a private car with 75,000 miles on it. They also find a retired pursuit with the same miles, but 900 more idle hours on it than the private one. Using Ford's published number of 1 idle hour equal to 33 miles on the odometer (since we don't have a published number from Dodge), it's comparable to have 104,700 miles on it. In this example/scenario, the pursuit that shows the same miles as the private car, may have more equivalent miles than the buyer is willing to accept.
It's not really anything to worry about if everything checks out okay, and as you mention it won't make a difference once you've bought it. However, that excessive idle time on the retired pursuit may bump the wear to a level the buyer isn't comfortable with, despite the odometer showing them a number they would normally accept.
 

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The point isn't to worry about it, or check it regularly. The point is to take idle hours into consideration along with actual displayed miles when buying it.

For example: Regardless of their reasons, say a buyer doesn't want to buy a car with 100,000 miles (just to use an even number). Let's say they find a private car with 75,000 miles on it. They also find a retired pursuit with the same miles, but 900 more idle hours on it than the private one. Using Ford's published number of 1 idle hour equal to 33 miles on the odometer (since we don't have a published number from Dodge), it's comparable to have 104,700 miles on it. In this example/scenario, the pursuit that shows the same miles as the private car, may have more equivalent miles than the buyer is willing to accept.
It's not really anything to worry about if everything checks out okay, and as you mention it won't make a difference once you've bought it. However, that excessive idle time on the retired pursuit may bump the wear to a level the buyer isn't comfortable with, despite the odometer showing them a number they would normally accept.
My mistake; I thought he had already purchased the car. Yes, check the engine/idle hours.
 

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Hmmmm. Yeah, it says it is. How did it get bumped to the top where I saw it? I certainly wasn't digging through the archives when I came across it (I do that from time to time). I wonder if the OP bumped it, while considering a different one. Odd. :confused:
Good catch.
 
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