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I don't get it, really. The transportation industry makes up 14% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Assuming (in some alternate universe) we make all cars, planes, and ships electric, the remaining 86% still exist. Hopefully Scats will be cheap when/if FCA goes full electric, because I know I want one to compliment the 5.7.
 

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We will see how the all electrification experiment goes in the other countries (e.g. Europe, California) and then we will see if there's a universal change to all electric. In the interim there will be a lot of industry and media coverage because it's an emerging technology.
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I don't get it, really. The transportation industry makes up 14% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Assuming (in some alternate universe) we make all cars, planes, and ships electric, the remaining 86% still exist. Hopefully Scats will be cheap when/if FCA goes full electric, because I know I want one to compliment the 5.7.
The remaining 86% are made up of various sub-industries who are all saying things like "our industry only makes up 7% of GHG emissions... assuming we make our emissions clean, the remaining 97% still exist."

To explain it another way, the other 86% of GHG emissions are being worked on to clean up at the same time.

Even if that weren't true, 14% less poo in your morning coffee is still 14% less poo, even if 86% of the barista's e.coli finger-droppings still make it in.

The only real argument I've heard against electric vehicles - and I've done zero research on this - is the question of what the environmental impact of all the battery tech is, compared to the petroleum industry and ICE vehicles. It's pretty intuitive that petroleum is massively dirty, from oil spills to outgassing to byproduct chemicals and it's pretty intuitive that what comes out your tailpipe is literally poisonous to breathe. It only a takes a few minutes looking at orbital pictures of Earth to recognize how thin the atmosphere really is and that looking up gives us the illusion it's infinite. So... not polluting the atmosphere is kinda common-sense. But... the exotic metals and processes involved with making modern batteries isn't without its dirty side. As a layperson I have no way to know if battery tech involves 3% as much consequence, 50% as much, or involves ten times as much. But that question is the only one left for me. Because I'm lazy.
 
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ICE or BUST!

From my dead, cold, hands....

And other sayings. :)
Devil's advocate... why?

I mean, I'm a Hellcat-owner, so clearly I'm a fan of big-displacement, high-power. But other than the sound, what would be meaningfully different if it was an electric engine delivering the same torque and horsepower? If I'm really honest with myself, other than sound... nothing.

So, genuinely, why?
 
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Devil's advocate... why?

I mean, I'm a Hellcat-owner, so clearly I'm a fan of big-displacement, high-power. But other than the sound, what would be meaningfully different if it was an electric engine delivering the same torque and horsepower? If I'm really honest with myself, other than sound... nothing.

So, genuinely, why?
For me, the only real thing is the rumble of a V8. Other than that, you can't beat the performance of an EV.
 

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To me the problem with electric is just the practicality of it. At the biggest super chargers (and not all are these)it can take up to an hour to charge you vehicle. At home chargers can easily take the majority of the day.

And then there are people who live in apartment buildings or don’t have garages, which will make it hard to charge at home.

While a lot can happen in years before 2035 when we are all supposed to be driving EVs, it’s hard to imagine that all of the infrastructure will really be there in 14 years.

Personally, I think hybrids will come into more of their own.
 

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Devil's advocate... why?

I mean, I'm a Hellcat-owner, so clearly I'm a fan of big-displacement, high-power. But other than the sound, what would be meaningfully different if it was an electric engine delivering the same torque and horsepower? If I'm really honest with myself, other than sound... nothing.

So, genuinely, why?
I can appreciate the devil's advocate, I often play it myself.

For me, its sound and practicality. At my most recent car cruise, we had to stop at some Tesla super chargers because one of the guys along the way...wasn't sure if he'd make it to the destination. Half hour just chilling there. Used it as a photo OP LOL
Sure, that'll be fixed over time but, yeah. I can't see myself williingly owning a EV as my sole vehicle within the next 10, 15 years.

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I can appreciate the devil's advocate, I often play it myself.

For me, its sound and practicality. At my most recent car cruise, we had to stop at some Tesla super chargers because one of the guys along the way...wasn't sure if he'd make it to the destination. Half hour just chilling there. Used it as a photo OP LOL
Sure, that'll be fixed over time but, yeah. I can't see myself williingly owning a EV as my sole vehicle within the next 10, 15 years.
Great photos!
 

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To me the problem with electric is just the practicality of it. At the biggest super chargers (and not all are these)it can take up to an hour to charge you vehicle. At home chargers can easily take the majority of the day.

As I see it the problem with EVs is not so much the practicality of them as it is the inconveniences of having to install a home charger, or the length of time to recharge, or the availability of chargers in multi unit dwellings, and the range. Home charging will most likely be at night when folks are sleeping and peak load demands don't have the power companies doing rolling blackouts.

And then there are people who live in apartment buildings or don’t have garages, which will make it hard to charge at home.

Some States are addressing EV charging in multi-unit dwellings. Below is a link. Find your State (Washington) and review it. Then go to California and compare the breadth of what they are doing compared to most other States. In regard to your point about apartments, they are addressing EVSE for multi-unit dwellings. Other states will follow California's lead on hybrids and EVs.

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives


While a lot can happen in years before 2035 when we are all supposed to be driving EVs, it’s hard to imagine that all of the infrastructure will really be there in 14 years.

The year 2035 is a ways off and different administrations between now and then might alter that target. The infrastructure will be a monumental challenge but its on a roll. I do a lot of driving and can attest that charging stations are being installed at more and more gas stations and travel centers on the main routes and even hotels.

Personally, I think hybrids will come into more of their own.

Picking on FCA, they already started moving in that direction with the Jeep Wrangler. In fact in 2 different directions at the same time. In one direction they released the Rubi 392 and in the other direction they have the eTorque and the 4xE. What concerns me, is what direction will Dodge go in the next generation Charger.
 

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To me, the biggest surprise on this subject was this article about a UC Davis study, which shows that in California, 18% of EV buyers give up the EV for gas-powered cars, and 20% of hybrid drivers do the same.
 

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The EV technology is still evolving and many EV owners are surprised to learn their old EV is not worth anything because it's too far behind the new EV offerings. Also, current EV's are only practical as a 2nd vehicle and not as the only vehicle. You also need to plan for power outages. You're not charging your car at home if the power is out. The #1 option package with an EV should be a Generac home backup generator.
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The EV technology is still evolving and many EV owners are surprised to learn their old EV is not worth anything because it's too far behind the new EV offerings. Also, current EV's are only practical as a 2nd vehicle and not as the only vehicle. You also need to plan for power outages. You're not charging your car at home if the power is out. The #1 option package with an EV should be a Generac home backup generator.
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In a worst case scenario they may not be practical as a #1, but I would hardly say an EV is not practical as a number #1 or only vehicle. I've heard countless people tell me a 6.4L Charger is not practical as a daily and at 140,000 miles and however many winters in PA here I am.

I could go 2 weeks on a full charge on a Model 3 standard including back to work. I've also never had the power go out for more than a few minutes in 8 years at my house.

Practical for everyone? No. But an EV is most certainly a practical everyday or sole vehicle for some people.
 
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I think EV's will mostly displace internal combustion engines in the next 5-10 years. The average consumer cares about cost (up front and operating). EVs are cheaper to operate by a wide margin, but are still expensive up front. That will change as production volume ramps up further. Where I live, electricity is about 11 cents a kilowatt hour. That translates into about $8 to drive 300 miles. Think about that. Driving the same distance in my scatpack would have cost me about $45-50. It adds up.

Performance-wise, it's already a no-brainer.

If you're a home owner, installing a charger in the garage is usually not expensive or difficult. I had mine installed when I had a home generator installed and it was an extra few hundred bucks and an hour or two of labor. Apartment dwellers....well, your choices are already limited on a number of fronts...not just with your car. If I always had to charge my car somewhere else, I might be willing to pay more for the convenience of gas/diesel.

If you consistently drive long distances at once, that's potentially a gotcha (today). The newest version of Tesla's supercharger can fill my Tesla 3 from 5% to 90% battery capacity in a little over 30 minutes. Those times will drop as the tech improves. That's longer than filling up at the gas pump, but not that long if you're stopping to grab a burger and take a leak on a long trip anyway.

Will I miss the rumble? Sure. However, I will not miss the additional maintenance or the additional few hundred a month I was spending on gas. I also like the idea of "making my own fuel" in the form of solar electricity. Try drilling for your own oil and then refining your own gas. :)

I haven't gone completely electric yet, but it doesn't take a genius to see how this plays out.

Best,
 
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So, genuinely, why?
1. Cost of the vehicles. 30K-plus for an electrified roller skate like a Leaf? 40-50K-plus for various Tesla products? I understand most of the public has already been cajoled into thinking incessant car payments are normal, desirable, etc.; however, how would this EV switch affect the lower rungs of society who drive less expensive cars out of necessity? Are you going to install their home chargers for them as well? Going to replace their batteries for them on 15-year-old EVs? On second thought, don't answer that. The government will probably have a stimulus or program for that...

2. Death of the auto hobby. Some of us simply enjoy buying and working on old cars, which will become increasingly more difficult and/or expensive. Of course, about 90% of today's beta-males can neither change a tire nor open a hood, so I guess I'm outnumbered on this one, too.

3. Some of us just don't like our choices narrowed without good reason. For those old enough to remember the release of Rush's Moving Pictures album in 1981 (40 years already...wow), take a listen to Red Barchetta. This kind of crap is exactly what Neil Peart was writing about. Pretty prescient, I'd say...
 

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I can appreciate the devil's advocate, I often play it myself.

For me, its sound and practicality. At my most recent car cruise, we had to stop at some Tesla super chargers because one of the guys along the way...wasn't sure if he'd make it to the destination. Half hour just chilling there. Used it as a photo OP LOL
Sure, that'll be fixed over time but, yeah. I can't see myself williingly owning a EV as my sole vehicle within the next 10, 15 years.

View attachment 298665
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These pictures make my want to go to Tennessee for the Mopar Meet in the Mountains next month even more.

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Once EV starts to be more prevalent and not in a small niche in the market I will then consider looking at them a little more seriously.

Tesla is really the only company that has anything viable right now, which will change soon as Ford, GM and finally FCA/Stellantis get more serious. Tesla needs more competition, that will hopefully drive the prices down on them, and give us more options than what is out there now.

In a few years I'm sure we will see them on the road more than once or twice a week here in my neck of the woods. To me that says the current alternatives are probably too expensive for the average consumer to obtain. The EV's I do see around me are the hybrids if you want to call them an EV, and there are not a lot of those, and of course a handful of Tesla's.

I would totally rock an EV myself, I just haven't seen one I want yet. Personally I love the look of modern muscle, probably stemming from my love of old school muscle. Now if someone comes out for something that looks as good as a wide body Charger powered by EV I would seriously consider it. And no, I DO NOT count that ugly Mustang-E, not the direction I would have gone with that, not to mention Ford isn't a brand I like much anyway.

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I'll tell you what i see in more numbers in our community each month; electic golf carts. That's about as advanced in the EV' market as my small community has gotten. Thats about as much need for an EV we have here. To get a gallon of milk at the local grocery, or head to the local park and lake.

Lord forbid the day we get our first Tesla or EVgo charging station. They'll hold a ribbon cutting ceremony and then have to pay some schmucks from the neighboring town to drive over in their EVs and hook it up for a photo op.

I truly expect our community will migrate to electric Ag equipment before the local city dwellers dive into full EV's.
 

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1. Cost of the vehicles. 30K-plus for an electrified roller skate like a Leaf? 40-50K-plus for various Tesla products? I understand most of the public has already been cajoled into thinking incessant car payments are normal, desirable, etc.; however, how would this EV switch affect the lower rungs of society who drive less expensive cars out of necessity? Are you going to install their home chargers for them as well? Going to replace their batteries for them on 15-year-old EVs? On second thought, don't answer that. The government will probably have a stimulus or program for that...

2. Death of the auto hobby. Some of us simply enjoy buying and working on old cars, which will become increasingly more difficult and/or expensive. Of course, about 90% of today's beta-males can neither change a tire nor open a hood, so I guess I'm outnumbered on this one, too.

3. Some of us just don't like our choices narrowed without good reason. For those old enough to remember the release of Rush's Moving Pictures album in 1981 (40 years already...wow), take a listen to Red Barchetta. This kind of crap is exactly what Neil Peart was writing about. Pretty prescient, I'd say...

1.) 40-$50k for a Tesla, in what market? You do realize a souped up Widebody Scat Pack sells for $60k. That mid model Tesla will blow the doors off a 392 and the Performance will do the same to a Hellcat. The maintenance on an EV is nothing compared to an ICE car. You do realize one Ford and GM start pumping out the EVs as they're planning that the price will drop significantly. As for the lower class or government assistance class, they already drive Bimmer's and Benz's meanwhile paying for 5 gallons of milk by billing the taxpayers.

2.) I love working on my V8 too and plan on keeping it. That being said, the hobby of cars is decreasing. Nobody cares about cars anymore. It's why Crossovers rule the market. Young kids couldn't care less anymore, and if they do, it's a 4x4. Look at truck sales vs not just muscle cars, sedans in general. Not even close in the US. Most people care about going from point A to point B, nothing more. You're right, it's embarassing the amount of guys who don't know how to change a battery, change oil, rotate a tire, change an air filter...but here we are.

I don't think ICE vehicles will be eliminated anytime soon. I think large displacement ICE with go first, then dwindle down to turbo 4s and 6s. It's just the way it is.

I love my V8, but I'm all for EVs.
 
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