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Discussion Starter #1
My 2009 Charger is cranking but not turning over, only code it throws I p0340. I’m not getting spark at my coils, but I’m getting correct voltage everywhere else. The crank and cam sensors are brand new and the fuel pumps good, what should my next move be? (Besides from chucking the 2.7 for a better quality engine). Should I trace the wires back to last place I’m getting spark? Is it my PCM?
 

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P0340 is logged for camshaft position sensor circuit but it can also be the crankshaft position sensor. Since you replaced both these sensors it may be the wiring harness/connectors. The PCM supplies the sensors with 5V and the sensors provide a signal back to the PCM. So an open/short in the wiring harness between the sensors and the PCM may be the problem. It's possible that it's the PCM but it's cheaper to check the wiring harness/connectors before replacing the PCM.
The 2.7L is a twin-cam design so I assume it has two camshaft position sensors like the 3.5L/3.6L V6 engines?
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Discussion Starter #3
P0340 is logged for camshaft position sensor circuit but it can also be the crankshaft position sensor. Since you replaced both these sensors it may be the wiring harness/connectors. The PCM supplies the sensors with 5V and the sensors provide a signal back to the PCM. So an open/short in the wiring harness between the sensors and the PCM may be the problem. It's possible that it's the PCM but it's cheaper to check the wiring harness/connectors before replacing the PCM.
The 2.7L is a twin-cam design so I assume it has two camshaft position sensors like the 3.5L/3.6L V6 engines?
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P0340 is logged for camshaft position sensor circuit but it can also be the crankshaft position sensor. Since you replaced both these sensors it may be the wiring harness/connectors. The PCM supplies the sensors with 5V and the sensors provide a signal back to the PCM. So an open/short in the wiring harness between the sensors and the PCM may be the problem. It's possible that it's the PCM but it's cheaper to check the wiring harness/connectors before replacing the PCM.
The 2.7L is a twin-cam design so I assume it has two camshaft position sensors like the 3.5L/3.6L V6 engines?
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just one cam sensor, just noticed there’s no bolt in the crank sensor and it doesn’t look like it was seated all the way in, im going to find a bolt at work tomorrow to replace it. Fingers crossed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alright, I finally checked my timing and I’m going to say it’s off. I know the top is supposed to be 60* at TDC. And my right one is close to it while my left side is a good ways away (the engine is not at TDC but it’s obvious they’re off). Can I fix my timing with the engine in the car? How do I fix it? And what does cost look like?
 

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the top is supposed to be 60* at TDC
I don't have any experience with the 2.7L but the Service Manual states that with the number one cylinder at TDC, on the EXHAUST stroke, the intake camshaft sprocket timing mark should be 90° from the cylinder head cover sealing surface; on both right and left cylinder banks.

295745


1. Remove cylinder head covers.
2. Rotate engine until number one cylinder is at TDC on the EXHAUST stroke.
3. View the intake camshaft sprocket timing mark. The mark should be 90° from the cylinder head cover sealing surface on both right and left cylinder banks.
4. Count chain pins from the mark on the intake camshaft towards the exhaust camshaft (1&3). Engine is timed correctly when there are 12 chain pins between the timing marks (2) on the intake camshaft and exhaust camshaft.

The 2.7L has a primary timing chain and two secondary timing chains.The primary timing chain drives both of the intake camshafts from a sprocket mounted on the crankshaft. The secondary timing chain drive system uses two chains, one at each cylinder bank, to provide a connection between the intake and exhaust camshafts. The intake camshafts drive the exhaust camshafts.
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Discussion Starter #6
I don't have any experience with the 2.7L but the Service Manual states that with the number one cylinder at TDC, on the EXHAUST stroke, the intake camshaft sprocket timing mark should be 90° from the cylinder head cover sealing surface; on both right and left cylinder banks.

View attachment 295745

1. Remove cylinder head covers.
2. Rotate engine until number one cylinder is at TDC on the EXHAUST stroke.
3. View the intake camshaft sprocket timing mark. The mark should be 90° from the cylinder head cover sealing surface on both right and left cylinder banks.
4. Count chain pins from the mark on the intake camshaft towards the exhaust camshaft (1&3). Engine is timed correctly when there are 12 chain pins between the timing marks (2) on the intake camshaft and exhaust camshaft.

The 2.7L has a primary timing chain and two secondary timing chains.The primary timing chain drives both of the intake camshafts from a sprocket mounted on the crankshaft. The secondary timing chain drive system uses two chains, one at each cylinder bank, to provide a connection between the intake and exhaust camshafts. The intake camshafts drive the exhaust camshafts.
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So, ran into an issue. When I move my crank / turn the car over looking for tdc. My camshafts don’t move, the chain doesn’t move. Did dodge put plastic teeth on the bottom gear or wtf is going on?
 

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As far as I know all the gears are metal. The chain guides are typically plastic. If a guide or the chain tensioner failed it's possible the chain slipped off the crankshaft sprocket. I don't know how many miles are on the odometer but it's also possible the chain stretched beyond the range of the tensioner and came off the crank sprocket. Only way to know for sure is to remove the timing chain cover and inspect the timing chain. I don't know if there's enough clearance, with just the cylinder head covers off, to get a borescope down to the crank sprocket for an inspection.

295752

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Discussion Starter #8
As far as I know all the gears are metal. The chain guides are typically plastic. If a guide or the chain tensioner failed it's possible the chain slipped off the crankshaft sprocket. I don't know how many miles are on the odometer but it's also possible the chain stretched beyond the range of the tensioner and came off the crank sprocket. Only way to know for sure is to remove the timing chain cover and inspect the timing chain. I don't know if there's enough clearance, with just the cylinder head covers off, to get a borescope down to the crank sprocket for an inspection.

View attachment 295752
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I’m sure it just came off the sprocket, but I knew some Chevy years ran plastic gears. In the process of pulling the front plate off now, if it came off the sprocket what are my chances the valves are bent?
 

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Description from the Service Manual ...
The 2.7 Liter (167 Cubic Inches) 60 degree V-6 engine is a double overhead camshaft design with hydraulic lifters and four valves per cylinder. The engine does not have provisions for a free wheeling valve train.

Translation: it's an interference engine.

Does not mean that damage occurred but you will need to remove the heads and inspect them to know. The reference to 60° is the V-angle between the cylinder banks.
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Discussion Starter #10
Description from the Service Manual ...
The 2.7 Liter (167 Cubic Inches) 60 degree V-6 engine is a double overhead camshaft design with hydraulic lifters and four valves per cylinder. The engine does not have provisions for a free wheeling valve train.

Translation: it's an interference engine.

Does not mean that damage occurred but you will need to remove the heads and inspect them to know. The reference to 60° is the V-angle between the cylinder banks.
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Alright thank you. Imma pull the plate off Monday, have family in town at the moment
 
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