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I have a question about OBD II Emissions inspections. Now obviously for the visual part there need to be catalytic converters but for the sniffer will High Flow Cats pass the test or are the Cats flowing a little to freely to burn up all the bad stuff the EPA says is a no no? I'm not really looking to get these right now but the question has been bugging me and I can't seem to find solid answers on our forum or other car forums other than "Hey I know a guy." Thanks for the info.
 

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I have a question about OBD II Emissions inspections. Now obviously for the visual part there need to be catalytic converters but for the sniffer will High Flow Cats pass the test or are the Cats flowing a little to freely to burn up all the bad stuff the EPA says is a no no? I'm not really looking to get these right now but the question has been bugging me and I can't seem to find solid answers on our forum or other car forums other than "Hey I know a guy." Thanks for the info.
Gladiator,

I can't speak to the high flow cats themselves, but one advantage you have is that you are using ACES IV. Because it uses BTU energy more efficiently, there will be naturally less emissions on the HC, CO, CO2, and NOx. The nice thing about the OBD-II is that as long as the onboard systems say everything is within tolerance/spec and they plug it into the OBD-II port for 30 seconds, all should be well.

Just my two cents to the BND Mafia at large.:biggrinjester:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC
440-821-9040
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is an answer I can't refuse. Thanks.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So essentially what Brian is saying is that if the car is not throwing a code then it will pass?
 

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Hey, I know a guy....And he has High Flow Cats...He told me alot of great info on them regarding Emissions in PA.
 

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I know lots of guys. :dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Do high flow cats often throw codes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Any other thoughts? Do they throw codes or are you guys controlling this stuff with the predator?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Anyone else have some thoughts on this subject?
 

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When I put mine on they throw a code with in 50 mile, I had to turn the rear 2 sensors off with my predator. I don't live a state where emissions are required to have. But I would have to say that if they plug in to your data port it will pick up that the rear 2 sensors are turned off. If they only go by visual and the sniffer I would bet your home free. I use to live in S-cal and I had several cars that were moded with cam's and headers that passed with better emissions then stock.

P.S I would also agree with Brian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Okay so the final idea is that they won't trip up the sniffer and the visual will be okay. The problem would arise if they went the extra mile and plugged into the thing. Does that sum it up?
 

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i recently ran into this problem with my high-flows, i failed the emissions for the ma. sticker. i purchased 2 set of fowlers from autozone, which brought the o2 sensor far enough to pass the emissions. also, no more check engine light.
 

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So essentially what Brian is saying is that if the car is not throwing a code then it will pass?
It depends. Some states just plug into your OBD port and as long as there are no codes and all the readiness monitors are set (and you pass the visual and safety inspection) it will pass. They check the readiness monitors to theoretically foil people who would otherwise clear their codes a few minutes prior to testing in the hopes that the code doesn't have time to reappear before the test is complete. Other states will do all that and in addition will run the car on a dyno for a few minutes to check that emissions are below the failure threshold.

All that said, there's no reason to think that a high flow cat would be any more prone to emissions failure. You might want to make sure the engine is nice and warmed up though.
 

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Just an FYI, its FEDERAL law that any tampering with the CATS, prior to 80,000 miles is a violation of FEDERAL law. If a cat fails before that time, it must be replaced with a STOCK part. Not Highflows or aftermarket.

That being said, not many states seem to press that point of law, but if the inspector wanted to, all cars he saw that did not have stock cats and were below 50,000 miles would FAIL even if the E-Test passed.

Actual law:

Catalytic Converter Laws

Rules for Replacing Converters
In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued new guidelines for the construction, efficiency and installation of aftermarket catalytic converters. All CleanAir converters listed in this catalog have been designed, tested and manufactured to meet this policy.

In addition, CleanAir converter listed in this catalog is appropriate for use under the current requirements of the California Air Resources Board (C.A.R.B.).
E.P.A. guidelines state that replacement converters may be installed only in the following situations:

1. The vehicle is missing a converter
2. A state or local inspection program has determined that the existing converter needs replacement
3. Vehicles manufactured prior to 1996 must have more than 50,000 miles, and a legitimate need for replacement must be established and documented
4. In cases of OBD Il-equipped vehicles (1996 and later), the O.E. manufacturer's 8-year/80,000-mile warranty must have expired and a legitimate need for replacement must be established and documented.
Please note that Federal law prohibits removal or replacement of a properly functioning O.E. converter.

When replacement of the converter is appropriate (as outlined above), the E.P.A. further requires that:

1. It be installed in the same location as the original
2. It be the same type as the original (i.e., two-way, three-way, three-way plus air/three-way plus oxidation)
3. It be the proper model for the vehicle application as determined and specified by the manufacturer
4. It be properly connected to any existing air injection components on the vehicle
5. It be installed with any other required converter for a particular application
6. It be accompanied by a warranty information card to be completed by the installer.
 
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