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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got my R1 Concepts slotted rotors and Posiquiet pads last night, spent part of today getting them installed. I think they look great - I'm not a fan of the drilled look so I went with just slotted.









If you're anything like me and haven't done brakes in years, here's a refresher course.

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The tools and supplies
Torque Wrench
Socket wrench with 13mm, 15mm, and 18mm sockets
Adjustable wrench
Floor jack (the one in the trunk works fine for this but you can only do one at a time with it)
Anti-squeal compound <<< I highly recommend a dark compound (black or gray) if you can get it since it may be visible after the job is done. I made the mistake of just grabbing what they had (RED) and ended up having to get something a little less noticeable. :)


Unpack and make sure you have everything.



Park your car on a hard, level surface. A garage or driveway is ideal. DO NOT ENGAGE THE PARKING BRAKE IF YOU PLAN TO REPLACE YOUR ROTORS.

Locate the brake reservior. When you pop the hood, it's right in front of the driver under an access panel. Remove the access panel, then clean the reservior cap and loosen it. Leave it in place to prevent anything from falling in.





Jack up one corner of the car and remove a wheel. I'm starting with the front passenger side.

Behind the rotor there are 2 bolts that hold the caliper in place. Loosen the top one and remove the bottom one. You'll need a 13mm socket for the bolt. If the guide pin (the inner bolt with the rubber gasket) turns, hold it in place with an adjustable wrench.
Top bolt:


Lower bolt:



Slightly compress the caliper by squeezing it toward you; this will retract the piston enough to allow some wiggle room. Rotate the caliper up; it will stay in place there, allowing you to remove the pads. If they caliper won't budge, it's likely that it's stuck to the pads. In this case, you may need to gently pry the pads off the caliper assembly with a screwdriver.

Loosening the pad:


This pad was stuck, now it's not:


Caliper up and out of the way



Notice the goo on the pistons. You'll want to clean this up with some brake cleaner and a rag. Be careful not to get any brake cleaner on the rubber parts.



Now we're ready to remove the pads. The thin silver metal pieces are anti-rattle clips; the pads sit in channels in them and the pads just slide straight out.



If you're planning on replacing just the pads, you can skip the next few steps. If you're also going to replace the rotors, here we go.

Use a piece of wire (or a coat hanger) and suspend the caliper through the bolt hole. Don't allow the brake line to get overextended or it could be damaged.



Now remove the top caliper bolt (the one you loosened earlier).
Look behind the rotor and you'll see two bolts holding the caliper adapter in place. Remove these using an 18mm socket. They're in there really tight so you may have to persuade them a bit. :)
Once they're free, the caliper adapter comes right out.





There may be a small clip over one of the wheel studs that you'll have to remove. Now the rotor pretty much just falls off. If not, you might give it few smacks with a rubber mallet to loosen it.


Let's take a look at those old rotors. A little wear on the outside, and a groove on the inside.









Here's the old pad (left) and the new pad (right). Still had quite a bit of pad left on the old set.



Now lets put the new rotor on. Use some brake cleaner to get rid of any dirt on the new rotor surfaces. Then it just slides on; I put a couple lug nuts on it to hold it in place while I get the pads ready.

Even though these pads come with anti-squeal shims, I like to put a little anti-squeal compound on them. A generous coat on the back of the pads (NOT THE PAD SIDE!). Might as well do all the front pads now since it takes a few minutes for them to set up.
Here are the rear pads coated. The fronts are done the same way.



Hey, now's a great time to clean up the wheel you pulled. I'll bet it looks pretty bad. After washing it down, I threw a coat of wax on the inside; brake dust rinses off a lot better on a waxed surface.


I also cleaned the wheel well and wiped a little tire shine in there while it's easy to get to.



Now reinstall the caliper adapter. The two bolts should be torqued to 70 ft-lbs.

Install the pads into the caliper adapter and anti-rattle clips. The anti-squeal compound is a bit sticky so be careful.



Before you re-install the caliper, you'll need to retract the pistons. If you can't just push them in with your hands, you can use a C-clamp but cover the pistons with a piece of wood to protect them - don't apply the clamp directly to the pistons. Check the brake reservior to make sure it's not overflowing. If it is, clean it up immediately.

Rotate the caliper back down and bolt it in place. The two bolts should be torqued to 44 ft-lbs. Use a little brake cleaner and remove any extra anti-squeal compound from the visible area - once everything is back together, you'll still be able to see this part.



Reinstall the wheel and lower the car. Torque the lug nuts to 110 ft-lbs.

Now repeat for the other front wheel.

The rears are done very similarly to the fronts with just a few differences.

The rear calipers and pads are quite a bit smaller. Remove the two caliper bolts using a 15mm socket. Again, you might need to use an adjustable wrench to hold the guide pin from rotating.


Suspend the caliper (it doesn't rotate up out of the way as easily as the fronts did).



If you're just replacing the pads, you can skip ahead again. If you're doing the rotors, stay with me.

Again, there are two bolts on the back holding the caliper adapter in place. You'll need the 18mm socket again and probably something to get more leverage (or do like I did and find a small hammer :)). Remove both bolts.


Here's the caliper adapter removed. You might want to clean it while it's out.



Now we need to remove the rear rotor. Mine was on really, really tight. I had to use a hammer to get it to come free. This could be because I had originally engaged the parking brake; releasing it didn't seem to make it easy to remove, though. Once the rotor is free, remove it. Notice that you have brake shoes for your parking brake; they are applied to the inside of the rotor hat, just like drum brakes.





Clean the brake shoes with some brake cleaner and inspect them for unusual wear.

Install the new brake rotor and hold it in place with a couple lug nuts. Reinstall the caliper adapter and torque both bolts to 85 ft-lbs. There's not much room to work so be careful not to hit the jack while you're working!

Put the pads in, then retract the caliper piston (using a C-clamp again if necessary). Check the brake reservior for overflow.

Bolt the caliper in place; torque them to 23 ft-lbs. Re-install the wheel, lower the car, and torque the lug nuts to 110 ft-lbs.

Now repeat for the other rear wheel.

Remember to properly close the cover on the brake reservior! Now get in and start her up. Press the brake pedal a few times. The first couple times brake travel will be pretty much to the floor. Once it firms up, you're ready to road-test, but be careful since they won't bite as well right away. Expect some smoking during the first couple miles. :smoke:

Follow the instructions to bed your brakes.
http://www.zeckhausen.com/bedding_in_brakes.htm

Admire your work!
 

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Great post! Thanks for the pics.

You have learned well, young Skywalker.
 

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How hard is it to change the break pads alone? Any special tools needed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just the pads it pretty easy. You'll need a 13mm socket for the fronts and a 15mm socket for the rear. You'll want to have a torque wrench to get the bolts tightened back to the right specs. Remember - the brakes are what keep you from careening into all kinds of things (and people) so you want to make sure you have them tightened correctly. :)

The process would be:
1 - lift the car
2 - remove the wheel
3 - remove the lower caliper bolt and loosen the top caliper bolt
4 - rotate caliper up
5 - pull old pads and insert new pads
6 - rotate caliper down
7 - reattach caliper and torque bolts
8 - put wheel on
9 - lower car

You can do just the fronts (both sides) or just the rears (both sides) or do all 4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You did all that work and didn't paint the cal's???


nice write up!!!
I had actually planned to but I figured I wouldn't have enough time to do them and let them dry properly (I had to do one wheel at a time with my jack). Next time. ;)
 

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Mike -that's an excellent write-up! One of the best I've seen on CF's! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mike -that's an excellent write-up! One of the best I've seen on CF's! :)
:embarrese Aw shucks, you're making me blush.......

Great write-up, looks very good. I think I'll be trying this myself when I need some new rotors and pads.
It's really not all that difficult but if you haven't done brakes in a while give yourself a couple more hours than you think you'll need. :)
 

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Just the pads it pretty easy. You'll need a 13mm socket for the fronts and a 15mm socket for the rear. You'll want to have a torque wrench to get the bolts tightened back to the right specs. Remember - the brakes are what keep you from careening into all kinds of things (and people) so you want to make sure you have them tightened correctly. :)

The process would be:
1 - lift the car
2 - remove the wheel
3 - remove the lower caliper bolt and loosen the top caliper bolt
4 - rotate caliper up
5 - pull old pads and insert new pads
6 - rotate caliper down
7 - reattach caliper and torque bolts
8 - put wheel on
9 - lower car

You can do just the fronts (both sides) or just the rears (both sides) or do all 4.
This would be a good project for me and my dad. I'm a novice macanic but he used to work on helicopters in VietNam and has some mechanical ability. Do you think it would be difficult for us? Or just follow you directions and everything would be all right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Pads only are pretty easy even if you've never done them before. Doing the rotors was a little more intimidating my first time.
 

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Maybe we'll try it...thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Stercrazy, tried to PM you but the system rejected it. You might want to get a hold of an LX service manual (PDF). It takes away lots of anxiety.
 

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bump for a good read.
 

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Wow, excellent presentation
 

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Mike, this is great! I wish I had known you already did one, and did it better! lol.
 

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Mike, it's been almost 6 months since you did this install. Do you have any thoughts on how well the new rotors and pads are performing?
 
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