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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2 questions...

#1
How hot do you think our manifolds get? I have the plastic 5.7 Manifold and I assume this must be a high temp plastic. I own my own powder coat business. If I preheat a part I can hit it hot with the powder. I only need to get the part to 390 degrees F. I would assume the manifold would be fine at these temps? I would have to cure for 10 minutes at this temp. I do lots of manifolds but always metal. Would hate to ruin this manifold by melting it to a pile of goo!

#2
The fuel line that drapes across the manifold on the 5.7l, can this be moved? I would assume if I re-route it behind the manifold using a fuel line rated hose would that be ok? Would it need any type of hose heat shield wrap or covering on the line like it already does? Any reason we cant do that? I'm not an mechanic expert so please fill me in to why we cant if its not possible?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well typically your right, you need a negative charge (ground) to the part you apply powder to. Now the manifold is plastic so it wont conduct the charge. You can do two things, use special nozzles which I don't have and they don't work as well as they claim anyways, or you can hit the part hot. If you pre-bake the part at 250-300 degrees F You then have a few minutes to spray the part with powder. When the powder fogs out of the gun and hits the part it sticks and melts since the part is hot. You can put the part back in and heat it up again at 250-300 and take it out and shoot again until you have a nice even coat. Once the part is coated you do need to do a normal full cure at 395 degrees F for 10 minutes. Do you think these plastic manifolds can take this? I don't but I am no expert. If it wrapped at all im out a manifold. Too Risky I think....
 

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The part is likely to be a nylon 6/6, and that will probably deform at your powder coating temps. You could always try and find one taken off a destroyed car and try it.
 

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Did a little more research.

One site states the material is Nylon 6, which has a MELT temperature of 428F. As I stated above, it is likely 6/6 which has a higher MELT temperature of 491F. What I couldn't find was a transition temperature. I still would find a scrap manifold to experiment on, and make sure your oven temp is very tightly controlled. A fixture may help hold and retain the shape during the process. I would also be worried about mfg stresses coming out during the heating process. If you can make this work, it might turn into a gold mine :) I'll send my bill later!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Did a little more research.

One site states the material is Nylon 6, which has a MELT temperature of 428F. As I stated above, it is likely 6/6 which has a higher MELT temperature of 491F. What I couldn't find was a transition temperature. I still would find a scrap manifold to experiment on, and make sure your oven temp is very tightly controlled. A fixture may help hold and retain the shape during the process. I would also be worried about mfg stresses coming out during the heating process. If you can make this work, it might turn into a gold mine :) I'll send my bill later!

Wow, Great Info!

If I can get my hands on a damaged manifold, I will definitely do this.

There is a thermosetting powder coat that can cure at (266 Degrees F. but doesn't come in all the great colors (Like Chrome). Just basic White, Black, Red's & Yellows etc. It does have some great resistance like other powders. I might just look into some new powder vendors to see if I can get a sample and see what heat temps these can withstand after a full cure. This might work :)
 
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