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I was and still planning on following maintenance schedula "A" in the owener's manual. However I noticed on my dealerhip's service department website (I do most of my own maintenance and use a non dealer mechanic for the rest) the services suggested from the dealer include the following:

1. Throttle Chamber Service - I have an idea what this is but do not see anything in the manual even close to this. I know on carb and throttle body systems you take the can of carb cleaner and and clean eveything up. The dealer was charging a hefty fee for this service.

2. Automatic Transmission flush at 30,000 miles - The owner's manul states that this should be done at 120,000 miles.....this seems like a loooong time to me. Also, what is involved in flushing the tranny? Is this something that I can do myself?

3. Brake fluid flush - Again, this is something not mentioned in the owner's manual. When if ever should the brake fluid be flushed?

Other maintenance questions I have:

1. Air Conditioning Filter - I am assuming this is the HEPPA filter for the cabin area. Where can one find an aftermarket filter and how much are they?

2. Fuel Filter - when should they be replaced?

3. Fuel Injectors - when should they be replaced or cleaned. If clean, how often and how?

4. Power Steering Flush - is this really needed and if yes, how often?

Most of this maintenance is for my wife's new/used car...2006 Dodge Magnum with 33K miles. It is good shape but I want to make sure it is properly maintained. Of course this maintenance will also apply to my Charger RT someday :)

I think this all for now anyways :)

Thanks
 

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Flushing any of the systems mentioned aren't a bad idea, and in many cases ARE preventative maint. that can eliminate a host of problems. Its amazing how long components will last when treated properly, and serviced regularly.
We have many folks who will demand engine oil & filter changes at 2-3k (and that's a real good thing!) but ignore other systems until they break. It's all the same.

30,000 miles for A/T svc & flush is good policy and what I shoot for. Some say 50k... I'm not comfortable with that. Of course, it is contingent on what kind of svc the trans has been subjected to. For example, Hard svc (such as towing) will cause the ATF to break down sooner, and dirty up sooner- maybe even burn it a bit. So 30k in that regard would not suffice. 120k on a un-flushed and unserviced tranny is NOT a good thing.

I have not looked at the throttle chamber/body on our '07 RT/RT yet (with only 2k miles), so I don't know how complex it might or might not be; but as you know, basically a good shot of cleaner in the butterfly (both cleaning the barrel and edges of the butterfly as well as its surface) is a good start for a throttle body. I honestly haven't worked on this newest generation of Mopars.

Brake flush- I like to do this every brake job, PERIOD. Money well-spent, IMHO. Clean brake fluid means clean internal components- no dirt or moisture/other contaminants in the fluid. Rust risk is minimized. Rubber stays healthier, and wheel cylinders for example, are less likely to stick and favor either the primary or secondary shoe. The same principle applies to brake calipers. Make sure to keep the caliper slider surface clean (and lubed if it's called for) as per Factory svc spec. When you R&R brake pads, if there are rubber/silicone grommets to replace, clean the area & replace the grommets EVERY service. Clean the caliper mounting pins every service- get all the gunk/dust/dirt off them with a wire brush/wire wheel. Make 'em shine before you re-install them. I can't tell you how many times I've found sticking calipers that were due to these last two omissions. Secondarily: due to contaminated (ie dirty, old) brake fluid.

Fuel Filter- if Mopars is still doing it, it is a canister assembly of filter & pump that drops into the top of the tank- looks sorta like a coffee can. Not cheap, (about $350) and you get the distinct pleasure of pulling the gas tank. :dead:

During the 90's, Mopar claimed 120k between changes (or was it lifetime of the vehicle?) Rubbish. 80k is pushing it, IMHO. You MAY get lucky..

A/C filter- if you have one, the element is available from MOPAR and is an "every 12K" scheduled item. I don't know how much leeway you get with these; but as in any other air filter, the operating environment determines how long or how short a lifespan it has.

P/S flush- this is just another "hydraulic system" (like the A/T); and hydraulic systems last longest when they are maintained properly. Many folks never flush the P/S system, or don't until they get a hose or seal leak (if at all and just add fluid..). Your seals and pump will last longer if you show it some love. 60k is a good start. 30k if you are a fanatic.

Fuel injectors: I'd like to see @ 35,000 between cleanings, no more than 50k. 50k is the point where you are wondering " whatss up"...it's gradually crept up on you and the motor just isn't running like you remember it once did.

I once worked in the Fleet Maint dept of a large Utility company for a number of years. By and large, the vehicles whose components lasted the longest, were serviced the most: at regular, short intervals. We had one guy who always brought his company vehicle in for oil changes at 2,000 miles, and tranny svc at 30,000 without fail. When he turned in his vehicle for a replacement, it had over 200,000 miles, not one oil leak, and had the original transmission. His vehicles were typically the best in the fleet. (Because he took care of them.)

There are other things to note, but this should give you a good start.

Synopsis: Oil/fluids replacement are cheap in comparison to components. :lol:
 

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What Crunchy said!

If you take care of it and regular fluid changes, washes, waxes,

1983 Celica 340,000 miles on original (never opened) engine. Rusted away
1992 Integra 300,000 miles. Stolen
1998 Caddy STS 235,000 miles. Sold to neighbor's kid when seat heater died. Still running.
1987 Toyota truck 230,000 miles. Sold for $500.

If you take care of it, It takes care of you.
 

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I was and still planning on following maintenance schedula "A" in the owener's manual. However I noticed on my dealerhip's service department website (I do most of my own maintenance and use a non dealer mechanic for the rest) the services suggested from the dealer include the following:

1. Throttle Chamber Service - I have an idea what this is but do not see anything in the manual even close to this. I know on carb and throttle body systems you take the can of carb cleaner and and clean eveything up. The dealer was charging a hefty fee for this service.

2. Automatic Transmission flush at 30,000 miles - The owner's manul states that this should be done at 120,000 miles.....this seems like a loooong time to me. Also, what is involved in flushing the tranny? Is this something that I can do myself?

3. Brake fluid flush - Again, this is something not mentioned in the owner's manual. When if ever should the brake fluid be flushed?

Other maintenance questions I have:

1. Air Conditioning Filter - I am assuming this is the HEPPA filter for the cabin area. Where can one find an aftermarket filter and how much are they?

2. Fuel Filter - when should they be replaced?

3. Fuel Injectors - when should they be replaced or cleaned. If clean, how often and how?

4. Power Steering Flush - is this really needed and if yes, how often?

Most of this maintenance is for my wife's new/used car...2006 Dodge Magnum with 33K miles. It is good shape but I want to make sure it is properly maintained. Of course this maintenance will also apply to my Charger RT someday :)

I think this all for now anyways :)

Thanks

I am an ex dcx certified tech.

1.This is a fuel system cleaning done with bg products. Highly highly recommend this service every 30k.

2. Fuel Filters need to be replaced every 30k . Also very vital. However most dodges dont have anything but the sock filter on the pump so check that your charger even has one. I left the dealer way before chargers started having anywhere near 30k.

Fuel injectors relates to one. Do not replace the injectors unless their is a problem or upgrading. These last hundreds of thousands of miles in most cases. The cleaning described in one will clean these.

4. Is the flush needed? Um. Let me be honest. In 7 years of working for ford and firestone both i had never heard of it. When i went to dodge they sold them like hot cakes. So does dodge recommend it yes. Do you have to/need to/ in my opinion no. The flush on the p/s is not high pressure so all it is is a fluid exchange. You can do the same yourself by sucking out the resevoir with a fluid exchanger or taking off a p/s line down low and letting it drain over night and filling it back up. With the later of those you will need to bleed the system (which is a cake walk) .
But 50k is good on p/s fluid.

When talking tranny flushes. . . the dealer will recommend either filter change/flush or both. Dont listen to the dealer . A. yes it needs done however the dealer will only recommend what they have the machine for. If they have a flusher they will tell you its the only option. If they do filter method they will sell you on that. B. we have a "sealed for life tranny" . What that means is it should have no fluid change and supposedly never a fluid related issue. This is why you have no tranny dipstick. However yes i would still change mine filter/pan or flush method, either one, but alternate, every 50 k.

Cabin air filter when its dirty. Depends on living area and climate

Dont forget spark plugs

Do not flush brake fluid. That is one of the dumbest things i 've come across in my times. After 5 years or so yes, just cause fluid does break down. Especially if exposed to any moisture. But if you have abs/trac/esp there is special procedures for bleeding the abs module/pump so its a pain in the ass.
Save your money on this and wait. This is better just gravity bleeding and draining out old fluid.
 

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Do not flush brake fluid. That is one of the dumbest things i 've come across in my times. After 5 years or so yes, just cause fluid does break down. Especially if exposed to any moisture. But if you have abs/trac/esp there is special procedures for bleeding the abs module/pump so its a pain in the ass.
Save your money on this and wait. This is better just gravity bleeding and draining out old fluid.
Dumbest? not on your life. P.I.T.A.? Yes it is for modern brake systems, and yes there are special procedures for those systems which make it a PITA, and probably WHY you think it is dumb (har!!) but nevertheless, it too is good PM. 3-5 years between flushes is a good rule of thumb; basically- when you have a brake job done, flush the fluid. Simple. You are already working with the brake system. Do it right. Some may require a special tool or two, along with procedures. No biggie, just follow the procedures. IMHO, if your car has 50k and has never been flushed, now would be a good time to do it. Gravity bleeding is good too, certainly better than not at all.

THE BG injector cleaning system rocks.

Another thing about A/T svc: don't go for the drop the pan/ replace the filter & refill type. You still have about 9 qts of dirty ATF in the torque converter, so this type of service is like taking a shower & then putting on dirty chonies. Have them flush the system with a machine.

UNless things have changed in the last few years, there IS a high-pressure side to P/S pumps, and that's why you have a thick pressure line (with swedged high-p fittings) and a regular return line. POWER STEERING= high pressure. As wicked said, though, you can either drop one of the lines & drain it, (usually the low-pressure return) or suck out the fluid from the reservoir.

wicked- are they still sticking the Dodge fuel filters in the tank? 30k intervals for gasoline (not diesel) fuel filters has been industry-standard for decades; but you can't really do that with the in-tank canister systems. I've been watching for some aftermarket, in-line product to come out to circumvent this issue. I don't know if anybody has or not.
 

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Great advice here - no need to add much more....but I will anyway! :D

It's really the brake fluid advice/servicing.

Personally I would not go more than 3 years without changing out the brake fluid. 2 would be better. I wouldn't flush the system every brake change (if I was managing one a year) as this would be slight over-kill. However, as it is one of the most safety critical systems on a car, then I guess if you feel the need to do it every brake pad change (if it is before a 2 year interval) then I guess as long as it doesn't prematurely wear the brake system out (excessive pedal pumping etc) then it can't hurt.

Brake fluid is a PITA anyway. Being hygroscopic, the stuff just loves to suck the moisture out of the air. that's why if you open a brake/clutch fluid container, it is best to throw what isn't used away, because once it is exposed to air, it will be nearly as fooked as the stuff in the brake system after a couple of years, even though it has just sat around.......
 

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Great advice here - no need to add much more....but I will anyway! :D

It's really the brake fluid advice/servicing.

Personally I would not go more than 3 years without changing out the brake fluid. 2 would be better. I wouldn't flush the system every brake change (if I was managing one a year) as this would be slight over-kill. However, as it is one of the most safety critical systems on a car, then I guess if you feel the need to do it every brake pad change (if it is before a 2 year interval) then I guess as long as it doesn't prematurely wear the brake system out (excessive pedal pumping etc) then it can't hurt.

Brake fluid is a PITA anyway. Being hygroscopic, the stuff just loves to suck the moisture out of the air. that's why if you open a brake/clutch fluid container, it is best to throw what isn't used away, because once it is exposed to air, it will be nearly as fooked as the stuff in the brake system after a couple of years, even though it has just sat around.......
Agreed! My 3-5 year interval suggestion is contingent on mileage/brake wear. IMHO, if you swap out front brake pads at say, 30-40k, it's a good idea to flush the fluid. Now if you are chewing thru brake pads every 15k, no I don't think flushing every time is necessary. For me, we do our front brake pads between 35-40k miles as per our driving habits on avg. Some get more life, some get less. We also without fail with our personal vehicles, drive below the 15k a year avg that is claimed in stats as normal. FWIW: Wife's Millenia S is a '01 that we bought new and we haven't reached 60k yet.
 
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