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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a SACHS SG414051 kit for my car. I can't seem to get the ball sockets to mount into the car. I've tried and tried without success. I called customer service and they assured me they were self-tapping. I seemed to have damaged one screw while trying to force it in.

Am I doing this wrong or WTF is going on?

Please excuse the dirty car, weather hasn't been cooperative lately.


 

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I put them on my '07 and had zero issue. Given that you should be able to install them in under 5 minutes, so something isn't right. Did you make sure the hole for the ball studs were clean? Looks like you cross-threaded that one. Was there any water in the hole? If so, that could account for some problem since it won't compress. Get a can of compressed air and shoot those holes to bake sure they're clear of any and all debris. The ball studs should just screw in with little effort.
 

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Look carefully in the hole for any weld splatter. If there's any in there, you're going to need to get it cleaned out. Easiest thing to do then, run a tap in the hole. Yes they are self tapping... actually thread forming screws and generally pretty easy. The one ball screw will have to be replaced.
 

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Look carefully in the hole for any weld splatter. If there's any in there, you're going to need to get it cleaned out. Easiest thing to do then, run a tap in the hole. Yes they are self tapping... actually thread forming screws and generally pretty easy. The one ball screw will have to be replaced.
I agree. Running a tap first is the best advice. That one stud might be salvageable IF you pre-thread the hole using a tap and clean up the threads on the stud using a file.

I also compared the pic of the aftermarket stud to the OEM one. The aftermarket one doesn't appear to be made of a high quality tool steel like the OEM. That may be why it stripped instead of tapping.
 

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I recall having to muscle in one of the ball studs while the other was a breeze. Good advice here to make sure no debris/water in hole.

Run a tap in there and see if you can salvage that one stud, it didn't look too far gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I take "running a tap" as re-drilling the hole..correct? What size would be good to use so it's not to large?
 

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Running a tap will thread the hole.

I recall that mine were also a pain to get in, however with enough downward force while turning they eventually threaded and sat flush, I just thought that they are not a critical bolt and brute force and ignorance would solve the problem, and it did.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Once again...running a tap.....??
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ended up trying the other ball studs and was able to get them in. Kinda stripped them but nevertheless, they're in and secured. Thanks for all the help guys!


Now I have two extra ball studs for sale...any takers?
 

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Once again...running a tap.....??

A tap is a tool designed to cut the appropriate threads in a hole. "Screw" it in and remove it and now your hole is threaded. Self taping screws are designed to cut their own threads as they secure themselves.
Glad to hear it worked out for you!!
 

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Wikipedia has an article
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tap_and_die

Tapping is the process of cutting metal.

The OEM ball studs actually "form" the threads, they don't cut the metal. End result is essentially the same, threads to retain the stud.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wikipedia has an article
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tap_and_die

Tapping is the process of cutting metal.

The OEM ball studs actually "form" the threads, they don't cut the metal. End result is essentially the same, threads to retain the stud.
You the man! Thanks for the help. Now to move onto replacing the hood release cable.
 
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