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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am looking into buying a 2011 charger r/t but it has 211k miles. The price is 5500. Is it worth it and how many more miles could i expect to get out of it? Update: not a fleet vehichle previous owner was an older gentlemen with bills of services done to the vehichle. It was a trade in and is coming from a reputable dealer in my area. Car currently has no mechanical or electical issues. Was garage kept.
 

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My opinion is the price is fair but it is likely overpriced. 2011, R/T, & 211,000 miles; not a lot to go on.

How many more miles can you expect to get out of it? Why is it being sold?

There are some members that have hundreds of thousands of miles on their Chargers and others that have new cars in the shop. I would venture to say the previous owner wasn't willing to roll the dice.
 

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2011 Charger RT's with 150,000 miles are going for $9,000 so the price is not unreasonable. I would not get a charger RT with that many miles unless there is documentation with respect to maintenance. Other things to look for would be parts replacement. Water pump, alternator, suspension, things that are not part of the normal maintenance cycle.
 

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Is it a fleet vehicle? One thing I haven't seen much of this board is odometer mileage vs. hours on an hour meter. Fleet vehicles will see 3 - 5 times the wear, as the actual odo mileage. When I had a car with one, it was almost dead even with my odo miles. On a similar fleet vehicle, 4.1 times the engine mileage. Think about driving one mile on a highway, vs. driving one mile in a city, and stopping every block, and the engine idling at each intersection. You have at least 6 times the wear on your brakes at a minimum.
 

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The price isn't bad, but my issue would be echoing what everyone else has said. You don't know what's gone on with the vehicle over that span of 211k miles, or what exactly it needs. Had you driven the car for even 50k of the last 211k miles, youd have an idea of the precise condition of the car and what it potentially needs.

You could buy it and it could last you another 50k without needing anything replaced, or it could need $3k worth of repairs now that you're unaware of.

If you're paying cash for the car, and you can get something in writing from the dealer that to the best of their knowledge it is up to date on required maintenance and they give you a 30-90 warranty, may not be a bad option.
 

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I thank the Lord for folks that think mileage is the end-all-be-all method for judging the condition of a used car. They've enabled me to drive much nicer cars than I otherwise would have for all my adult life.

With the exception of cars I've bought brand new and maintained myself, the best-running cars I've ever owned have all been what most would consider to be "high mileage", and the low-mileage garage queens have been the source of most of my aggravation and headaches.

To me, there are a number of things more important than total accumulated mileage.

How was it driven? It's essentially impossible to measure the difference in wear between a 5 mile trip and a 500 mile trip. A driver with an unusually long highway commute will roll up the miles very quickly, but put very little wear on most of the car's mechanical components. Was it flogged like a rented mule by two or three owners, or carefully maintained by the original buyer?

Where, how and under what conditions was it stored? Some folks literally drive from a garage at home to a garage at work, while others leave their car stewing in the elements 24/7. Has it experienced rapid temperature swings? If it's in a state that's regularly exposed to freezing temperatures at night and warms considerably during the day, it could develop internal engine rust, because cast iron "sweats", just like a cold beer can on a hot summer day.

How are the cosmetics? Is it covered in spur marks inside and out? Scratched, faded paint, rough interior, worn pedal pads, damaged door panel from where the driver routinely kicked it open? Paint worn off the knobs? Carpet worn through? Scruffy wheels with damaged clearcoat from long winters and/or sloppy tire mounting? Or does it look more like a typical four or five year old Charger?

How does it run? How's the handling and ride quality? Anything other than the usual Charger rattles, clunks, and squeaks? Grab a cheap ELM327 Bluetooth OBD adapter, download the free trial version of AlfaOBD, and see what the BCM will tell you. Scan for codes. You might be surprised at the wealth of information in there, including tidbits like how many hours a particular light bulb has been illuminated.

If you're a numbers guy and want to know something really useful about the car's history, divide the odometer reading by the total accumulated engine hours from the EVIC. That will give you the car's lifetime average MPH, which at least tells you something about how the car was used. For example, if your car has 5000 total engine hours, that would be an average speed of roughly 42 MPH, which means that car lived it's life on the highway. From what I've seen, your typical Charger Pursuit has anywhere from 7,000-10,000 hours on retirement...and plenty of folks buy them and get more years of use out of them.

That price seems a little rich for my taste, unless the car's in remarkably good condition, but it's not crazy high. I think I'd take it to a mechanic for a really thorough inspection and compression test, examine the service records carefully, get mycarfax.com (the free one) and vehiclehistory.com reports, and use whatever you find to negotiate the best possible price for the car.

Good luck!
 

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I've been thinking this for a few years now, that with all of the technology in these cars, they need to do away with mileage as a be all/end all way of considering a cars value and condition. There should be an algorithm that figures out the wear and tear on the car.

Considering two identical cars, depending on how their driven, one with 100k miles could be in better condition than one with 30k miles. 100k in highway miles is much easier on a car than 50k of 10 minute commutes to work.
 

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Like said, one of the best indicators of how a car was used is to divide the odometer by the engine hours. Police vehicles last a long time generally because they follow a severe duty maintenance upkeep.
 
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