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I wanted to verify that we have 2.82 gear ration on our 5.7 hemi chargers. Also what is the stall speed on our torque converters and has anyone had any experience with the performance torque converters that are out there?
thanks,
spittle
 

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5.7's have the 2.82 gear and aprox 2000-2200 stall TC. Stall will vary depending on your mods...more torque gives you higher stall.

The pro torque or precision industries converter will bring up to the 2800 - 3200 range while remaining perfectly streetable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info. How do you like your torque converter? I was afraid to get one but I guess a lot of people are running with the 2800's and they say they are very streetable so how is your day to day driving?
thanks,
spittle
 

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Just because im curious by nature, anyone have a good explanation of how the "stall" works (or what that means?). I wont say anything about it because I know how people read stuff and quote it as being true. But if someone could explain why a higher "stall" is better or how the stall its self translates to the converter that would be super, m k.

;)
 

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An easy way to think of it is compare a higher stall converter to a car with a manual transmission. Drive a vehicle with a manual transmission allow you to control the RPMs that you take off at. Launch just off idle and the car will pull away smoothly. Dump the clutch at 3000 RPMs and hold on. You'll be higher into the horsepower and torque curve so the vehicle will launch much harder. The same goes for a converter with a higher stall speed. The stock stall is in the 1900/2000 RPM range. Go with something in the 2800-3000 range and you'll be launching alot harder. Some compare it to being shot out of a cannon :)

More info about torque converters can be seen here - http://auto.howstuffworks.com/torque-converter.htm

Hope this helps!
Tom



TBYRNE MOTORSPORTS LLC
ORDER LINE - 1-877-4-TBYRNE (1-877-482-9763)
E-MAIL - [email protected]


CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE POLICY!
 

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yep hes dead on. for drag racing you want the stall to lock up or 1 to 1 right when your power band of your cam comes on. I had a 4000 stall in my 93 Z28 man I miss those days I used to get a lot of looks from people leaving the traffic lights lol


An easy way to think of it is compare a higher stall converter to a car with a manual transmission. Drive a vehicle with a manual transmission allow you to control the RPMs that you take off at. Launch just off idle and the car will pull away smoothly. Dump the clutch at 3000 RPMs and hold on. You'll be higher into the horsepower and torque curve so the vehicle will launch much harder. The same goes for a converter with a higher stall speed. The stock stall is in the 1900/2000 RPM range. Go with something in the 2800-3000 range and you'll be launching alot harder. Some compare it to being shot out of a cannon :)

More info about torque converters can be seen here - http://auto.howstuffworks.com/torque-converter.htm

Hope this helps!
Tom



TBYRNE MOTORSPORTS LLC
ORDER LINE - 1-877-4-TBYRNE (1-877-482-9763)
E-MAIL - [email protected]


CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE POLICY!
 

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An easy way to think of it is compare a higher stall converter to a car with a manual transmission. Drive a vehicle with a manual transmission allow you to control the RPMs that you take off at. Launch just off idle and the car will pull away smoothly. Dump the clutch at 3000 RPMs and hold on. You'll be higher into the horsepower and torque curve so the vehicle will launch much harder. The same goes for a converter with a higher stall speed. The stock stall is in the 1900/2000 RPM range. Go with something in the 2800-3000 range and you'll be launching alot harder. Some compare it to being shot out of a cannon :)

More info about torque converters can be seen here - http://auto.howstuffworks.com/torque-converter.htm

Hope this helps!
Tom



TBYRNE MOTORSPORTS LLC
ORDER LINE - 1-877-4-TBYRNE (1-877-482-9763)
E-MAIL - [email protected]


CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE POLICY!
I don't have much experience racing Automatics only Manual's, I understand that if you have a manual tranny you can put the car into 1st gear while the clutch pedal is depressed and raise the RPM'S to whatever you want to get a faster launch but how does this happen with automatics?

I am still confused:knockout: does this happen with the automatic car in drive or in neutral? To clarify my question does my car have to be in "Neutral" then I would step on the gas the RPM'S will go higher than stock with the new torque converter and the I just slam it into "Drive"?

If so wouldn't this damage the transmission, I know that by racing your car its obviously going to wear out your trans faster than if its only used for normal driving.

What do you have to do while your in the driver seat to take advantage of the high stall converter?
 

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I don't have much experience racing Automatics only Manual's, I understand that if you have a manual tranny you can put the car into 1st gear while the clutch pedal is depressed and raise the RPM'S to whatever you want to get a faster launch but how does this happen with automatics?

I am still confused:knockout: does this happen with the automatic car in drive or in neutral? To clarify my question does my car have to be in "Neutral" then I would step on the gas the RPM'S will go higher than stock with the new torque converter and the I just slam it into "Drive"?

no in Drive hit the brake and throttle and the converter will slip to whatever RPM it is set for then release the brake your off to the races at the higher rpm


What do you have to do while your in the driver seat to take advantage of the high stall converter?
read above lol
 

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You step on the brake, apply gas inscreasing the rpm's to about 2500, then let go of brake while romping on the gas. At 2800 rpm the TC LOCKS up, meaning the output is the same as the input, instead of say 1800 rpm in and 1000 rpm out. The stall rpm number is the rpm that the torque converts fully engages so to speak, or think of it as, the rpm at which the clutch pedal is fully released.
Sam Adams is to blame for any inconsistencies in the above mentioned post.
 

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You step on the brake, apply gas inscreasing the rpm's to about 2500, then let go of brake while romping on the gas. At 2800 rpm the TC LOCKS up, meaning the output is the same as the input, instead of say 1800 rpm in and 1000 rpm out. The stall rpm number is the rpm that the torque converts fully engages so to speak, or think of it as, the rpm at which the clutch pedal is fully released.
Sam Adams is to blame for any inconsistencies in the above mentioned post.
Wait a minute is this while the car is in Drive? Because if it is my tires will just spin......
 

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My car won't stop at any RPM it will just spin the tires.

The point @ which the brakes will no longer overcome the torque is the stall speed.

W/the stock convertor it was about 2400 RPM. W/the Pro Torque I can get about 3200 RPM.

Get a good set of drag radials that have been staged properly (warmed up) & instead of your tires spinning, exceeding the stall speed of the TC will push you through the lights.
 

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So let me see if I have this right, with the high stall converter I can rev up higher while in Drive and for example if I was using your converter I can rev it up to 3200 and my tires won't spin?
 

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That's correct. I can jump in my car, foot on the brake and give it gas. The tires will usually start to spin around 2000 RPMs. Using a higher stall converter would allow the RPMs to go higher before that happens. That means that your higher into the horsepower and torque curve and the car will launch higher. Another way would be for a dead stop, the car idling in drive, you mash the throttle. RPMs jump up to about 2000 or so and the car launches. A torque converter with a higher stall would allow those to jump up higher and it's time for you to hang on. Sticky tires and good traction allow you to take advantage of this.
 

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That's correct. I can jump in my car, foot on the brake and give it gas. The tires will usually start to spin around 2000 RPMs. Using a higher stall converter would allow the RPMs to go higher before that happens. That means that your higher into the horsepower and torque curve and the car will launch higher. Another way would be for a dead stop, the car idling in drive, you mash the throttle. RPMs jump up to about 2000 or so and the car launches. A torque converter with a higher stall would allow those to jump up higher and it's time for you to hang on. Sticky tires and good traction allow you to take advantage of this.
I think this finally explained it for me after doing a lot of reading. I can brake and get the rpms higher before spinning tires. OR, if I simply mash the gas at a stoplight, the torque converter will get me to higher rpms faster. Correct?

Would a tc be overkill for the street if I just plan on sticking with the F1's or equivalent?
 

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Lock-up is exactly that. At idle, the hydraulic fluid is still squeezing through the vanes, allowing some engagement. Then at a predetermined RPM range, the hyd. fluid locks up (stall) and you have full engagement.

An example would be like facing up hill, the car won't move at idle (not enough engagement from the TC, but on a flat surface the car will roll forward. This is good because if you had lock-up at 750 RPM the motor would die.

So on the OEM TC it takes around 2K RPM to lock up the converter to get that car going up the hill (depending on the grade).

Taking off normally with higher TC, I doubt you would feel much, but if mash the gas, the TQ will allow a higher RPM to fully engage it, thus snapping your neck back.....wheeeeeee

The only bad part is that at crusing speeds of 70 MPH your engine is only requiring 2200 RPM (because of the gearing), the OEM TC is good to go because it only needs like 2K RPM for lock-up, a higher stall TC is not fully engaged (it wants 2800 RPM's) and the hyd. fluid is still squeezing thru the vanes and heats up from all the work. A good quality aftermarket transmission cooler really should be part of the package if you go for it.

Btw, sitting in traffic at idle is a killer on the tranny fluid. Heats up real fast from all the squeezing.
 
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