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Right now my car is at the dealership getting its state inspection. They wanted $150 to change the brake fluid. I plan on changing the diff fluid and possibly replacing the brake pads and rotors depending on what condition they are in.

How easy is it to change the brake fluid. I don't want to get air in the system. The shop manual says to pump the fluid out of the master cylinder and replace it but this does not change the fluid in the lines or calipers. I have tried searching the forum for a good way to flush the system (not bleed the system) and can't find any good threads. Does anybody know of a good thread or can give me a step by step for completely flushing and replacing the brake fluid?

I found one thread that said to simply open the bleeder screw and let the old fluid run out while filling the reservoir with new fluid. This seems like it would create a mess and not work because of the location of the bleeder screw on top of the caliper. Can I just pump the brakes and refill the reservoir until new fluid runs through the bleeder screw?
 

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Right now my car is at the dealership getting its state inspection. They wanted $150 to change the brake fluid. I plan on changing the diff fluid and possibly replacing the brake pads and rotors depending on what condition they are in.

How easy is it to change the brake fluid. I don't want to get air in the system. The shop manual says to pump the fluid out of the master cylinder and replace it but this does not change the fluid in the lines or calipers. I have tried searching the forum for a good way to flush the system (not bleed the system) and can't find any good threads. Does anybody know of a good thread or can give me a step by step for completely flushing and replacing the brake fluid?

I found one thread that said to simply open the bleeder screw and let the old fluid run out while filling the reservoir with new fluid. This seems like it would create a mess and not work because of the location of the bleeder screw on top of the caliper. Can I just pump the brakes and refill the reservoir until new fluid runs through the bleeder screw?
The best way is still to have 2 people. One person behind the wheel and the other at the caliper. The person at the caliper sais down and the person behind the wheel pushes the brake pedal to the floor and holds it there. The person at the caliper when they say down...opens the bleeder screw and the fluid comes out of the caliper. When the person behind the wheel sais floor, then they keep their foot to the floor and the person at the caliper closes the bleeder screw. Then the person at the caliper sais up.

Then the process starts all over again. Do this for each wheel until the fluid comes out clear. Keep a watch on the reservoir so that you don't suck in air. We have been doing brakes this way for many years. If you don't get the brake fluid out every 3 years, it will absorb enough moisture to rust the system internally. I have seen some brake fluid come out of cars that have never been changed that looked more like salad dressing than brakefluid..YUK.

Bleedem is freedom!!

Hope this is clear.

Thanks
Brian
BND Automotive LLC
440-821-9040 :bigthumb:
 

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Thanks Brian. That is exactly the clarity I was looking for.
 

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Thanks Brian. That is exactly the clarity I was looking for.
Your Welcome!!

Brian
BND Automotive LLC
440-821-9040 :bigthumb:
 

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Brian- are you offering high performance brake fluids yet? ;)
 

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Brian- are you offering high performance brake fluids yet? ;)
Rich,

That is the only fluids I have stayed away from because of the liability. Hey, so and so crashed and his car burned. Didn't they put that guy's brake fluid in?.....hey, we could take his house and his SRT8.:confused:

No thanks.

Thanks anyway.:bigthumb:

Brian
BND Automotive LLC
440-821-9040
 

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A more "painless" way to change your brake fluid is to use a power bleeder. I use the one from Motive. It's basically a pressurized tank that looks like an exterminator's kit. You put a couple of quarts of new fluid in the tank, remove the master cylinder cap, replace the cap with the cap from the bleeder, pump it up to 8psi or so and then visit each corner's caliper and bleed until fresh fluid comes out. RR, then LR, then RF, then LF

It's not that big of a mess if you connect a small hose to the bleeder screw on the calipers to redirect the spent fluid into a bottle/bucket. I try to do this about every 2 years on all of my vehicles. I used to use Valvoline synthetic DOT4, but that's no longer available so I'll switch over to ATE Super Blue (also comes in gold color which is great for alternating flushes so you'll know when the old fluid is bled out) next time around.

With the power bleeder, I can do a fluid change by myself in about 45 minutes (with suitable loafing time added for beer exchanges). If you've got access to a lift, it's more like 10 minutes since you don't need to remove the wheels to get at the bleeder screws.

http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/ate/ate_superblue_fluid.jsp
http://store.motiveproducts.com/sha...reType=BtoC&Count1=215419948&Count2=132560372

Best,
 

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A more "painless" way to change your brake fluid is to use a power bleeder. I use the one from Motive. It's basically a pressurized tank that looks like an exterminator's kit. You put a couple of quarts of new fluid in the tank, remove the master cylinder cap, replace the cap with the cap from the bleeder, pump it up to 8psi or so and then visit each corner's caliper and bleed until fresh fluid comes out. RR, then LR, then RF, then LF

It's not that big of a mess if you connect a small hose to the bleeder screw on the calipers to redirect the spent fluid into a bottle/bucket. I try to do this about every 2 years on all of my vehicles. I used to use Valvoline synthetic DOT4, but that's no longer available so I'll switch over to ATE Super Blue (also comes in gold color which is great for alternating flushes so you'll know when the old fluid is bled out) next time around.

With the power bleeder, I can do a fluid change by myself in about 45 minutes (with suitable loafing time added for beer exchanges). If you've got access to a lift, it's more like 10 minutes since you don't need to remove the wheels to get at the bleeder screws.

http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/ate/ate_superblue_fluid.jsp
http://store.motiveproducts.com/sha...reType=BtoC&Count1=215419948&Count2=132560372

Best,
Yes, a couple years back I got a Motive kit. Much easier, especially when doing a bleed solo. I have used it on my wife's Mercury, and on my prior vehicle, a Pontiac. I recently purchased the Dodge adapter for it to prepare to change my Charger's fluid, but I usually change fluid every 2 years, and my car is just now 1 year old, so I have another year for it.
 
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