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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well we knew it was coming, and it is now happening. We recently received a letter from the licensing company that handles Chrysler/Mopar trademarks. We have been told that we are not allowed to advertise our graphics with any Trademark Infringing logos incorporated in them. This includes, Charger, Hemi, SRT-8, R/T, Mopar, Super Bee and others.

We will be still taking customer requests for "CUSTOM" text and logos, we will just not be able to advertise any trademarked property. We may or may not be able to continue to offer the same decals we have been offering in the past, so if there is something you have been contemplating buying, you might want to order before the website is changed.

If there is something you do not see, please email, PM or make a note in the comment section of Paypal.
We are working to come up with some exciting new designs that comply with this request from Chrysler and do not incorporate any of their Logos.

The thing that is the most upsetting about this is the fact that even though we cannot use these without being licensed, Chrysler is NOT currently issuing and licenses for any of the current production vehicle logos or names.

Thanks,
Ridergraphix.com
 

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Ridiculous. You know I could see them crying about this if they were making any type of accessories for are cars along the lines of ridergraphixs and the others but they dont make **** as far as decals or anything else goes. If they are not going to provide there customers with accesories to set there vehicle apart from the rest why the hell are they complaining because someone else is?
 

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I'm sure they are going to crack down on everyone. Then once that’s taken care of they are going to charge outrageous fees to use their name. Squeezing every penny out of the name they bought that they can.
 

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They already lost me thats for sure. I was going to buy a Challenger but this company knows nothing about cars, cares little about their customers, and only wants to squeeze money out of everything no matter the consquence to the consumer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was actually told it was about customer confusion, and they did not want their customers to think they were buying something that is made and approved by them, and then have something be less than excellent quality. The strange thing is, they are not doing any licensing for this at all, so I guess it's not all about the money.

I had a long conversation with the third party company they use to do their licensing, and even the person I spoke to could not understand why they were doing what they are doing. You would think they would be happy to have customers telling the world what brand/model car they are driving, but they would rather keep it a secret and let sales go down to tube. I don't understand it, but we need to comply. Just keep in mind, we can always do "Custom" customer requested text.
 

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They already lost me thats for sure. I was going to buy a Challenger but this company knows nothing about cars, cares little about their customers, and only wants to squeeze money out of everything no matter the consquence to the consumer.
After what they did to HiDes and her stalling Charger, I'm a little weary with Chrysler also. The funny thing is, I was actualy never into domestic brands. After owning the Charger for 6 months, I'm seriously leaning towards another brand on my next trade, even though I'm craving that Challenger. Makes a computer that is extremely hard to crack for mods, now prevents people from putting stickers on their cars, just because it's not made by them? Lol!! Friggin st*pid!
 

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I have to agree. Who in the world goes and buys vinyl and thinks it's coming from the Chrysler themselves? Same thing with Reflective Concepts. If you are dumb enough to think you are buying a Chrysler product then they should give it up. I'll be placing my order probably tonight. I still can't decide what I want to do with my incoming hood.
 

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It seems the new owners are totally out of touch with the MOPAR enthusiasts.
 

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It seems the new owners are totally out of touch with the MOPAR enthusiasts.
The "new owners" are investment bankers. Their MO is to acquire a company, maximize profits from all existing intellectual property (including trademarks), strip away any assets they can sell without seriously impacting (negatively) their bottom line, etc. And then when they are done, they'll try to sell the whole shebang off for more than they paid (hopefully giving THEIR investors a good return on their money). That sell off might be as one big company or as parts chopped up to maximize their sales value. In other words, they are there to make money, not to impress the enthusiasts. I'll be curious to see if this kind of "tough love" will clean up Chrysler and bring it back to profitability.

Blaming the shark or the coyote for doing what just comes naturally seems a bit masochistic. Predators only go after the sick and the weak. Chrysler will either get stronger or get devoured in the process.

Best,
 

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My girlfriend is a Law Clerk, and she just happens to be currently specializing in Intellectual Property and Patent Protection.

Basically, any company that owns a Trademark or Patent is obligated to actively and vigoroulsy defend it, or risk losing it.

By sending that letter, Chrysler is simply protecting its Trademarks.

-=FLEX=-
 

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I understand protecting your investments and making a profit but does Ford and GM do this to their people?

Why don`t they just paint every car they mass produce and paint it white stick a cheap vinyl interior dog dish hubcaps on steel wheels and slap a taxi sticker on them - JEEZZZZZ- BEAN COUNTERS SUCK.

Shades of Lee Iacoca??



Scott
 

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An example...

Let's say the Chrysler didn't protect its trademarks when it came to certain aftermarket products (graphics, emblems, t-shirts, novelty items, whatever). Eventually they lose control over their trademark. It doesn't seem like a big deal when you consider only these minor 'niche' players.

But then what if Ford decided to market a HEMI Mustang? What then? Now Chrysler is in a dificult position. Naturally they don't want another auto maker using the HEMI nameplate, but if they haven't enforced their trademarks in the past, then it will be more difficult for them to enforce them now.

That's the way the American legal system works.
 

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Let's say the Chrysler didn't protect its trademarks when it came to certain aftermarket products (graphics, emblems, t-shirts, novelty items, whatever). Eventually they lose control over their trademark. It doesn't seem like a big deal when you consider only these minor 'niche' players.

But then what if Ford decided to market a HEMI Mustang? What then? Now Chrysler is in a dificult position. Naturally they don't want another auto maker using the HEMI nameplate, but if they haven't enforced their trademarks in the past, then it will be more difficult for them to enforce them now.

That's the way the American legal system works.
I'm sure Chrysler pay to keep their trademarks, in a "routine" basis. Only by not doing that, they'll loose the rights.
 

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Let's say the Chrysler didn't protect its trademarks when it came to certain aftermarket products (graphics, emblems, t-shirts, novelty items, whatever). Eventually they lose control over their trademark. It doesn't seem like a big deal when you consider only these minor 'niche' players.

But then what if Ford decided to market a HEMI Mustang? What then? Now Chrysler is in a dificult position. Naturally they don't want another auto maker using the HEMI nameplate, but if they haven't enforced their trademarks in the past, then it will be more difficult for them to enforce them now.

That's the way the American legal system works.
that was a great example. i was thinking the same thing but i didnt know how to put it into words. you did it perfectly.
 

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Let's say the Chrysler didn't protect its trademarks when it came to certain aftermarket products (graphics, emblems, t-shirts, novelty items, whatever). Eventually they lose control over their trademark. It doesn't seem like a big deal when you consider only these minor 'niche' players.

But then what if Ford decided to market a HEMI Mustang? What then? Now Chrysler is in a dificult position. Naturally they don't want another auto maker using the HEMI nameplate, but if they haven't enforced their trademarks in the past, then it will be more difficult for them to enforce them now.

That's the way the American legal system works.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that the vendors we see here are making these trade-marked items under appropriate licensing. Therefore what is Chrysler protecting? Assuming this is the case, there is no trademark infringement to be concerned about so their issue lies elsewhere.

That's the way the American legal system works.
That right there is the root of most of America's problems.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was under the impression that the vendors we see here are making these trade-marked items under appropriate licensing. Therefore what is Chrysler protecting? Assuming this is the case, there is no trademark infringement to be concerned about so their issue lies elsewhere.



That right there is the root of most of America's problems.
I'm assuming that if the vendor in question here was duly licensed then they wouldn't have gotten a "please stop that" letter.

Best,
 
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