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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently left my car in the care of my grandpa...which turned out to be a mistake. He left the car in his drive way, halfway parked in the grass. It got wet from the sprinklers and was very water spottty when I got it back. Some neighborhoods here use "reclaimed water" for their sprinkler systems, which is basically recycled from waste water.

Now I have stains on my car, luckly it looks fine when the car is dry but if you take a damp cloth and wipe the car with it you can see all the water spots that it had when I got it back from him. I notice it mostly when I dry the car after washing it. The spots are on the paint as well as the windows.

Has anybody seen or heard of this before? Any advice on how to get rid of it? I thought about trying a wax or something like that, but I didnt want to just put another layer on top of it and then not be able to get it off later.

Any advice would be great.
 

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Use the Meguiar's clay bar, it should be able to get the spots off.
 

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Or spritz it with vinegar/water mix and wipe it down. It's just minerals in the water that dried on the car. Don't panic, they will come off! :D
 

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def use the clay bar. Use 1/2 the bar, constantly turning and folding it. If you drop it on the ground, it immediately goes in the trash can!

Put on a good paste wax afterwards.
 

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Watch Junkman's videos in the detailing thread if you have never clayed/polished before. I did mine by hand with Meguiar's clay and professional line of polish/wax and it worked great. If you don't want to do it by hand, get the PC kit from Adams and go to town. :bigthumb:
 

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Use the Meguiar's clay bar, it should be able to get the spots off.
While this will work, the other suggestion of using vinegar+water to wipe down the car will be a lot easier on the arms and take a lot less time. 'Course if the car needs to be clayed anyway, you can kill 2 birds with one claybar.

Best,
 

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I use DriWash.


I just did a little demo for you guys. I put some of my fine mineral intense well water on my car and let it dry to a NASTY waterspot (I apologize to those with weak stomachs).


Gently rubbed on a little DriWash. When I say gentle, I'm talking like washing your windows kind of gentle.


And buffed it off.
 

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This may sound odd, but the easiest way to remove water spots is Turtle Wax Bug and Tar Remover. I have tried all the "products" that "claim" to remove the spots but they don't work so well.

Then I happened to try Turtle Wax Bug and Tar remover on my outboard and it removed the water spots in one pass and left an excellent shine (as it waxes when you buff)

So I tried it on my water stained Jeep, it now looks perfect, no marks at all and this was after trying all the so called spot removers. It also works great on removing brake dust off the rims with no side effects and far easier than the products that are sold to do that.

Don't believe me, try it! You will be convinced

I use it on my boat, 4 jetskis and rims on the cars and they all look like new after an application. Also, on the jetskis, no wax I have ever tried has held up as well.

Far cheaper than the specialty products and puts everything from Meguiers in the trash.

Clay bars work, no doubt but its a lot of work. Turtle wax bug and tar remover is non abrasive (never any paint color on the cloth) and so easy to use. Spray on, wipe then let dry and buff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey Guys, thanks for all the advice. I think I'll start with the vinegar and water mix first and see how that goes. These arn't your average water spots so hopefully it works. The car has been washed several times since this happened and they still show up at the end of the wash when I'm drying the car. Once its dry they fade away. Ill update later if the vinegar does the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I tried the vinegar and water trick to get the spots off but they didn't budge. I used various ratios of water/vinegar but none of them worked. I guess I'll have to try the clay bar next unless there are any other miracle cures out there.
 

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I'm in the same boat as you... I can't get my water spots out either. Did you try the turtle wax bug and tar stuff yet? I might give that a try soon.
 

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I also am having trouble getting some water spots off. They won't even come off with the claybar. :/
If this is fresh water damage, then the clay should easily remove it. A lot of people don't know how to clay. Watch this short video of me going at it.

How to Clay
 

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if the water spots are etched and into the clear coat you may have to resort to polishing them out. Use the least abrasive polish and pad combo and work your way up slowly. If you're just starting out then you can't go wrong with the Adam's line and a PC.

But like others have suggested, claying is inexpensive and should be tried before polishing to remove that. But worst comes to worse and the water is still there then that means there is some damage to the clear coat and you will have to polish.
 

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I enjoy detailing but using the clay bar i do not enjoy. My arms feel like they are about to fall off when im done and feel the after effects for days ;o(
 

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I enjoy detailing but using the clay bar i do not enjoy. My arms feel like they are about to fall off when im done and feel the after effects for days ;o(
The first time I did my whole car, my ball and socket joint hurt for 3 months (no joke). I almost went to the doctor because I though I had torn something!
 

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I posted this in another thread. Hope this helps.

This is from Automotive Detailing Inside & Out; a Knowledge Base for the Perfectionist– by Jon Miller. He is a very knowledgeable individual who knows detailing inside out and am fortunate to have his words on the detailing forum I am a part of.

(the information below is not mine and has been copy and pasted from another forum. All credit is due to Jon Miller, author of Automotive Detailing Inside & Out; a Knowledge Base for the Perfectionist)

Water Spots
If you look at a highly- magnified cut-away of a base/clear-coat paint system, it resembles a sponge. The resin system is what holds it together; part of the system has been corrosively eaten away that is why acid rain damage is seen as etching or pitting.

The misnomer ‘water spots’ are caused by a moderate to high alkaline or acidic solution, both of which can cause paint discolouration, surface etching (a concave circular mark and pitting) leaving microscopic surface imperfections and micro pores in the paint film surface that are vulnerable to deterioration, which need to be removed and naturalized as soon as possible.

There are two categories of water spot-
a) Stage One Corrosion [: defined as a surface with light to moderate corrosion damage to the paint surface]

b) Stage Two Corrosion [: definition when the dirt/corrosion deposits are no longer on the surface but have started to break down the molecular structure, leaving an etched or white haze on the surface after the stain has been removed, with moderate to serious paint damage]

a) Surface water spots- (Stage One Corrosion) alkaline watermarks consist of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) both of which are basic (alkaline pH 10) that alight on the surface; ultra violet (heat) radiation (UVR) will leave a white ‘water mark’, the minute crystals bond to the surface, they will not wash off as they are insoluble and if left for any length of time they will etch the paint film surface leaving a concave circular mark, remove surface deposits with detailer’s clay and an acetic acid pH 2.0 (vinegar) to naturalise the alkaline

b) Below surface (etched) acidic spots- (Stage Two Corrosion ) are caused by an aggressive alkaline or an acidic solution (acid rain, bird excrement or industrial fallout) causing a chemical reaction, if left for any length of time they will etch the paint film surface leaving a concave circular mark. Unlike water spots which typically have a white outline of the spot, acid rain etching is smaller and you can see the damage in the clear coat. Etched acid rain spots are one of the most difficult paint defects to remove so be patient as it will probably take more then one attempt to remove them. Acid spots require an abrasive polish to level the surface (some stubborn marks may require wet sanding) and an alkaline solution to neutralize them, simply rinsing a vehicle with deionised water or tap water activates / reactivates the acid concentrates.

Products - A B C Decontamination / Neutralization system - Automotive International - Valugard Product Line (See also Industrial fall out (IFO) Acid rain and Reactivity)

If the paint can be rectified by chemical means then this is the answer; not abrasive polishing. Using the correct chemical cleaners will dissolve the contaminants rather than abrading the paint. With all cleaning products (especially solvents) always test a small inconspicuous area first to ensure it won't discolour, stain or etch the surface, and ensure that the pH of the product is suitable for the material After the paint surface has been subjected to a chemical cleaning its protective layer (s) have been removed and the paint surface left without protection, so it is very important that a polymer and / or Carnauba wax protection be applied immediately

Always use the least abrasive product first-
1.Use a paint surface cleaner (Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner)
2.Try to dissolve the alkaline-based, surface/etched mineral water deposits try one or more of the following;
3.Use a 2:1 or stronger solution of distilled water/distilled white vinegar (Acetic acid)
4.Try a 2:1 solution of distilled water/Isopropyl Alcohol (adjust ratio as required)
5.Or equal parts distilled water/distilled white vinegar/Isopropyl alcohol.
6.Clean the effected surface with Klasse All-In-One or Zaino Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner
7.Use detailing clay to remove any `hard' surface granules
8.Use a machine polish (Optimum Polish, Optimum Compound) and a cutting (LC White, Orange or Yellow) foam pad (speed # 4- 5.0) to level the surface
9.For Ceramiclear or other hard clear coats substitute Menzerna for machine polish; Super Intensive Polish / Nano Polish (105FF) or Final Finish Polish (106FA)
10.Use the least aggressive polish/foam pad first, if this doesn’t remove the problem step-up to a more aggressive polish / foam pad set-up
11.Wet-sand with 2000, 2500 or 3000 grit finishing paper

1a) Removing surface (Stage One Corrosion) –

Methodology
•Use detailing clay to remove any `hard' surface granules
•Use a paint surface cleaner (Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner)
•Dissolve the alkaline-based, surface/etched mineral water deposits try one or more of the following;
a) Use a 2:1 solution of distilled water/distilled white vinegar (Acetic acid)
b) Try 2:1 solution of distilled water/Isopropyl Alcohol (adjust ratio as required)
c) Or equal parts distilled water/distilled white vinegar/Isopropyl alcohol.
Allow chemical solution sufficient dwell time (5-10 minutes)
•Use a clean spray bottle and 100% cotton Micro fibre cloth to apply the solution to the surface
•Or soak a first aid gauze pad with the vinegar/ water solution, this will help it stay in place during the necessary dwell time, 5-10 minutes) wipe off any residue from surface and dry with a damp waffle weave towel
•Use a clean spray bottle and 100% cotton micro fibre cloth to apply the solution to the paint surface
•Wipe off any residue from the surface and dry with a damp waffle weave towel
•If any `water marks' remain apply distilled white vinegar or Isopropyl alcohol un-diluted to a 100% cotton micro fibre towel, using a medium/heavy pressure on surface, for stubborn spots use an abrasive polish as in 1b)

Products- Danase Water Spot Remover easily removes hard water spots and calcium deposits that etch the surface. Safely bring back and rejuvenate the finish on your painted, clear coated, or glass surfaces with Danase Water Spot Remover.

1b) Removing etched below surface (Stage Two Corrosion)-

Methodology
•These can be removed by using detailer's clay to remove any hardened surface deposits
•Then using a machine polish ( Optimum Polish, Optimum Compound, Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner or Klasse All-In-One ) and a cutting (LC Orange or Yellow) foam pad (speed # 4-5.0 / 1200 RPM ) to level the surface (use the least aggressive polish/foam pad first, if this doesn’t remove the problem step-up to a more aggressive set-up)
•Work on a very small area at a time (2-foot x 2-foot) until the polish has run out
•Repeat this process two or three times, as necessary
•Reapply surface protection once spots have been removed.
•If none of the above methods remove the etched water spots consider wet-sanding the paint finish (See also Wet Sanding)

1c) To neutralise acid water spots using a polish or compound will remove the etching and the indentations, the surface should then be neutralised A B C Decontamination / Neutralization system (http:// Automotive International - Valugard Product Line) a safe alkaline wash and neutralizing system, this three part system comprises;

A-Acid Neutralizer, B-Alkaline Neutralizer (use in conjunction with detailers clay to remove ‘water spots’) and C- Surface Conditioner with a pH of 7.0, which safely removes both surface and subsurface contamination and neutralizes any residual acid from the painted finish. (See also Acid Rain & Reactivity)

Notes:
Synthetic steel or bronze wool whatever the grade can leave micro-scratches in the glass, which then become impregnated with road dirt, grit and grime, causing a clouding the glass over time, which impairs visibility.

Do not use abrasive cleaner; glass polish or any grade synthetic steel wool on after market-tinted glass or you will probably scratch the surface.

For deeply etched water spots (> 0.004 Mil) in the windshield surface, do not attempt to polish them out, consult an automotive windshield vendor as glass or plastic used on later model cars is soft and thin (this may vary by manufacturer) due to weight / cost savings by vehicle manufactures and polishing could cause surface to become badly scratched, stressed or cracked.

Be cautious with polishes that contain abrasives like aluminium or cerium oxide as they have the potential to damage glass beyond repair.
Some windshields and mirrors have a tinted plastic coating or a blue tint that will scratch or be damaged, only use a glass polish (not synthetic steel or bronze wool) on uncoated glass.
 

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How long does it usually take to Clay bar your entire car?
 
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