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Build your own complete, kickass intake for $103.40


The Frankentake Project started out simple: Stick a big 9" long S&B filter on my K&N Typhoon like Meister did to his, when he showed everybody it kicked ass at GIFO's 3 and 4.


Frankentake I was my own version of his intake, with the heat shield removed after extensive intake air temp tests (round 1, rounds 2-5, round 6) showed no heat shield was necessary and ambient air was plentiful in the engine cavity with a couple of minor modifications.


Frankentake II was an attempt to utilize the unique properties of Weapon-R's tube-in-a-tube design. Having participated in their 5.7 prototype program I had a couple of them sitting around, so I cut one off a bit and stuffed it under the hood with the S&B filter. The dyno runs at Modifications Face-Off 4.1 were inconclusive but even before this event I had decided to take a different turn with the project...


Frankentake III is a fully home-brewed intake solution. Its design mandate is to be made up of readily available parts that anyone can get hold of. These parts should be cheap, but also cheap-smart. We want to build a good kit and not a piece of crap. And it should be easily assembled using tools you already have in your garage, or won't mind buying.


But when it comes to the all-important filter, spare no expense. F-III's Frankenfilter has a 4" inlet, with a 10" or 12" media length, 6.5" diameter at the base, 5.25" diameter at the top. where a chromed end cap holds more filtration material for max inflow... like we need more with a filter thats a foot long. Originally S&B had agreed to make a custom filter just for this project. That was a 10" long filter with an enlarged diameter power stack on top. However that hasn't materialized so far and this filter is off-the-rack.


The filter inlet and tube is oversized at 4" in diameter. The tube is made of very thin but strong alloy. It will shuck heat faster than the thicker alloy tubes found in the K&N Typhoon or the Weapon-R, and its still very strong (refer to the temperature tests to learn why you should not worry about heat soak inside the tube). However if you want a thicker tube I have a source for that as well as will be described further on.


Is F-III the end of development of this concept? I seriously doubt it. For starters you will have the option of custom-spec'ing your own filter, and in fact there are some very smart people on this forum doing exactly that right now. Further, after assembly of the first unit tonight I can see a couple of things I could have done differently, and some things I might change. I'll cover that in the assembly post.


Finally, F-III wasn't just my project. It was a community effort and I hope it will grow from wider exposure now that its 'gone live'. I would like to sincerely thank Meister, Rev. Hammer, CoolVanilla and Cam for their invaluable assistance in helping me scrounge parts and figure this thing out.


So here we go. First I will describe the parts, the tools needed for assembly, the assembly itself and driving impressions.

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Rubber elbow: 3.5" to 4"
Cost: $17.08 (http://store.airflo.com/90hl40r35.html)

One of the things I wanted to do early on was use 4" tubing which necks down at the last moment to 3.5"; giving a potential for max flow down the oversized 4" tube and a velocity increase at the point of the neck-down, where that velocity increase should also provide a temperature reduction to the incoming air. Double Party Bonus if the theory holds up. We'll have to see if the increase in volume thanks to the oversized tubing, backed up by the oversized filter, is the good thing its hoped to be.

I would have preferred to use silicone over rubber. However the silicone reducing elbows available on the market have hard 90-degree bends in them rather than the smooth transition of this unit. Well-shaped silicone elbows are available in 3.5", but a 4" tube was a firm requirement. Rubber versus silicone is not the end of the world. Its what the stock intake uses. This piece is made very well of heavy rubber. Absolutely smooth inside. Very well-formed.



Alloy tube: 4" x 1'
Cost: $6.90 (http://store.airflo.com/al4.html)

A straightforward one-foot-long tube of strong, thin alloy. For mine, I sanded it down with my Porter Cable polisher (oh yeah... it was designed as a sander first and a car polisher second) using 220 grit to give it a poor-man's satin finish. Then I spray-painted it flat black. I am sure most people can do better than that. To fit the air filter on the tube -- which is sold in minimum lengths of 1-foot -- had to be cut down. More on that in the Assembly section.

NOTE: The above two items can be purchased together. Combined cost is $33.89 if shipped by Ground.
Alternate Source:
Cost $11.73+ shipping http://stores.channeladvisor.com/ver...21-065-6063-T6?
After most parts were already purchased I began talking with Verocious Motorsports (http://verociousmotorsports.com) and found that they had everything but the elbow above in their store. including a more expensive but thicker alloy tube. This alloy tube is twice as thick (0.10/ inch vs. about 0.05) and is closer to what you find on the K&N Typhoon tubing. The thicker tube is harder to cut through and heavier, and it remains to be seen if it is better or worse to have thicker tubing. If you buy all of your parts from Verocious you will spend more on the parts but you will make it up in combined shipping and have an easier buying experience.
T-bolt clamps (two 4" and one 3.5")
Cost: $12.79 shipped (http://siliconeintakes.com)
Put simply, T-bolts are better than hose clamps. This web site had them the cheapest and the vendor behaved like a stand-up guy during an EBay transaction I did with him. Now that the clamps have arrived they appear to be of fine quality and, at present, are the cheapest to be found on the Web.
Alternate Source:
Verocious Motorsports. two 4.38" and one 3.88" clamp. $10.50 + shipping
http://stores.channeladvisor.com/ver...Hose Clamps/
Air Filter
S&B Model R1182 (blue)
S&B Model R0866 (red)
(10" filter) about $39
(http://verociousmotorsports.com). Part description is found at http://sbfilters.com/product_display.php?id=2594.
Not on the Verocious web site. You will have to call it in. Temp tests have shown the 12" filter below is prone to ingesting warm air around its base (about a 12-14-degree differential) UNLESS you use a longer tube and relocate the power steering reservoir. A 10" filter is more in keeping with the original Frankentake I, which is known to pull only cool air.
Alternate Source: S&B model R1187 (blue)
S&B Model R0872 (red)
(12" filter) about $42.00 (http://verociousmotorsports.com). Part description is found at http://sbfilters.com/product_display.php?id=2604
This part is not on the Verocious web site. You'll have to call it in with your order at the present time. Sorry my packing list didn't have itemized pricing on it and I forget *exactly* what I paid for it. This filter is actually drop-shipped from S&B directly and, while the parts description clearly says "blue" you can see its red in the photo below. Make sure Verocious knows to rag on S&B to get it right in advance.
NOTE: The 12" filter was the originally published F-III filter, but F-III was not designed to use it. Circumstances conspired to make the 12" filter the rollout unit and subsequent testing showed it to bag some warm air at its closest point to the engine. If you think the 12" filter is bitchen, go for it. Otherwise wait until Mods Face-Off #5 when we dyno the thing to see whether its flow characteristics outweight the heat drawback.
ANOTHER NOTE: Some time after this article was published Rev. Hammer told us about his power steering reservoir relocation mod, which allows 3-4 more inches of extension for an air filter and tube. Use it and you can move your 12" filter entirely into the cool zone.
 

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Wow, very thought out and USEFULL!!!! Thanks for this write up, you've just save me alot of money! Great job!
 

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No support bracket?

After seeing my filter shake itself loose 3 times in 10k miles, I know a support bracket is important. I'd be worried that you have quite a paperweight hanging onto that barely nubbed throttle body/butterfly.. Hopefully it doesn't fall off when you hit a bump.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
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