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I have warped 2 sets of factory OEM disks, 2 sets of EBC drilled and slotted, and my current "Power Stop" also slotted and drilled disks in my 2010 Dodge Charger R/T. I don't understand how aftermarket brakes that are supposed to be rated for the Race Track keeps warping with regular commuting. I've had the car checked and they cannot find anything that could possibly be causing this.

What should I have checked? Or is this a chronic issues with the Chargers? Is there another brand that is guaranteed that this not happen?

Thanks in advanced.
 

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First off - have you ever properly bedded in the brakes when you've bought them?

What are your driving habits like? 90% of the time is because of the way people drive (especially when it's happening with different brands of products).

Are you running aftermarket/huge/heavy wheels?
 

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The number one cause of disc warping is heavy braking and then holding the pedal at the stop to create a "hot spot".

Once the vehicle comes to a stop, you should let it creep forward a little at a time to put the pads holding at new positions to allow the disc to cool evenly. Release pressure, let it creep a few feet and then re-apply, repeat at least twice after heavy braking, once after moderate braking.

Bedding the brakes like InvicutSRT8 described helps mate the surfaces and even out the heat transfer. But you still need to avoid holding and creating a hot spot.

The other cause of warping is generally rare but involves heavy braking heating and then rapid cooling like slamming into a puddle after heavy braking causing rapid quenching of the exposed rotor surfaces except the part covered by the caliper. This creates a quench differential that causes the rotor to warp. It is essentially the inverse of the hot-spot creation.

Creation of the hot spots is the most common issue.
 

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Why have slotted and drilled? Slotted is good enough for pretty much everything. Drilled rotors are not nearly as sturdy as just slotted rotors. And I'm not exactly an expert but look at it this way, brakes change kinetic energy in to thermal energy. Drilled rotors can actually decrease braking performance due to lack of mass compared to regular rotors. I don't even think Nascar uses drilled rotors.

I use the cheapest slotted option from Rockauto, the Raybestos. They are great and better than stock since the centers are painted black and don't rust like stockers.

Thirdly, who is telling you they are warped? Maybe a local shop trying to get your business? I really don't mean to suggest anything untoward, just know who you're dealing with. I'd stick with near stock options unless you're really tracking and driving the crapola out of this car.


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Proper bedding is key and along with Ddaddy's statement heavy braking with a long stop will create the sensation of warped brakes.

Try bedding the brakes to even out the pad transfer on the rotors. Here is how I bed my brakes with every new car and everytime I replace my brakes.

http://www.zeckhausen.com/bedding_in_brakes.htm
 

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I have warped 2 sets of factory OEM disks, 2 sets of EBC drilled and slotted, and my current "Power Stop" also slotted and drilled disks in my 2010 Dodge Charger R/T. I don't understand how aftermarket brakes that are supposed to be rated for the Race Track keeps warping with regular commuting. I've had the car checked and they cannot find anything that could possibly be causing this.

What should I have checked? Or is this a chronic issues with the Chargers? Is there another brand that is guaranteed that this not happen?

Thanks in advanced.
I would upgrade to some brakes that are closer to what come on an SRT8. Wilwood makes a very nice 14.25" diameter kit for the front that is guaranteed to make those seat belts leave bruises across your chest when you slam on the binders: http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeKits/Br...+5.7+Liter+&+3.5+Liter+w/+Dual+Piston+Caliper

What makes these superior to OEM syle brakes is the 6 piston calipers that distribute heat more evenly (reducing total heat) and the 2 piece rotor design. The outer disc of the 2-piece disc/hat assembly is allowed to expand and contract better without distortion. Disc brakes have come a long way since the 70's but the 1-piece rotors are still flawed by design. To overcome this inherent design flaw you have to upgrade to 2-piece rotors. Because we own MOPARS, no one makes a 2 piece rotor to replace the OEM rotor. That leaves you no option but to upgrade to a kit like Wilwood's. This kit actually will fit inside of 18" wheels which is even better! No wheel upgrade required!
 

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I failed to mention about the weight savings and FUEL MILEAGE increase.

These Wilwoods are much lighter than the OEM cast iron caliper/rotor setup even though they are much bigger. The lighter weight means less unsprung weight at the wheel. This means the car will handle better when going over bumps.

The gas mileage increase I'm claiming will be challenged by everyone reading this I'm sure. I would be one of those challenging this statement had I not experienced it for myself. I personally installed 13" Wilwood rotors with 4 piston Wilwood calipers on the front of my 2000 Dodge Dakota for the purpose of stopping better pulling my boat. I was blown away when my highway fuel mileage went from 14mpg to 16mpg. The only explanation for this is better design. The piston seals on ALL calipers have a special lip that "sucks back" the piston slightly from the brake pad after releasing the brakes. This helps reduce friction on the pads while the brakes are NOT being applied. Wilwood seams to have made their seal/piston design so that the pistons have less preload on the brake pads when no brakes are being applied. This equates to less rolling resistance, longer pad life, and BETTER fuel mileage.
 

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I have warped 2 sets of factory OEM disks, 2 sets of EBC drilled and slotted, and my current "Power Stop" also slotted and drilled disks in my 2010 Dodge Charger R/T. I don't understand how aftermarket brakes that are supposed to be rated for the Race Track keeps warping with regular commuting. I've had the car checked and they cannot find anything that could possibly be causing this.

What should I have checked? Or is this a chronic issues with the Chargers? Is there another brand that is guaranteed that this not happen?

Thanks in advanced.
I have Power Stop "Top Cop" brakes on my 2010 Charger Pursuit, and do none of the things that people have posted that may cause warping, and have at least one warped front rotor now. I properly burnished them, properly torqued wheels, I don't abuse them, hold them down, or any other excuse for have a warped rotor. Should I cool them down with water at every stop light, them tuck them in at night and give them a warm bottle of milk?

I'm contacting Power Stop.
 

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I have Power Stop "Top Cop" brakes on my 2010 Charger Pursuit, and do none of the things that people have posted that may cause warping, and have at least one warped front rotor now. I properly burnished them, properly torqued wheels, I don't abuse them, hold them down, or any other excuse for have a warped rotor. Should I cool them down with water at every stop light, them tuck them in at night and give them a warm bottle of milk?

I'm contacting Power Stop.
The post you responded to is 3 years old. lol. Anyway, it isn't possible to "warp" a rotor. That is a myth. What you are feeling in the pulsating brakes is brake pad material transferred to the rotor caused by improper braking techniques. Hard, late braking and then holding your foot on the brake once stopped is the most common cause of this.
 

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The post you responded to is 3 years old. lol. Anyway, it isn't possible to "warp" a rotor. That is a myth. What you are feeling in the pulsating brakes is brake pad material transferred to the rotor caused by improper braking techniques. Hard, late braking and then holding your foot on the brake once stopped is the most common cause of this.
I read the date on the post. I don't like starting new posts for something that has been addressed. Then we have a bunch of repetitive posts. Is there a problem with replying to older posts that I'm not aware of?

I really shouldn't have used warped. It's the rotor runout. I never mentioned anything about pulsating, so I don't know where you got that. And as I mentioned, I have NOT sat at lights holding my foot on brakes, and do not use improper braking techniques. Also, I definitely do NOT do late hard braking. Do you work for Power Stop? lol.
 

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I have warped 2 sets of factory OEM disks, 2 sets of EBC drilled and slotted, and my current "Power Stop" also slotted and drilled disks in my 2010 Dodge Charger R/T. I don't understand how aftermarket brakes that are supposed to be rated for the Race Track keeps warping with regular commuting. I've had the car checked and they cannot find anything that could possibly be causing this.

What should I have checked? Or is this a chronic issues with the Chargers? Is there another brand that is guaranteed that this not happen?

Thanks in advanced.
I've warped my share of rotors over the years and I started a technique that has stopped warping. When I come to a stop, no matter the braking, I find the sweet spot of pedal force and keeping the car from creeping forward. This keeps the least amount of pressure on the rotors. I also allow the car to creep forward a few inches every few seconds or so, this will allow the heat of the pads to dissipate over the entire rotor.
 

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I read the date on the post. I don't like starting new posts for something that has been addressed. Then we have a bunch of repetitive posts. Is there a problem with replying to older posts that I'm not aware of?

I really shouldn't have used warped. It's the rotor runout. I never mentioned anything about pulsating, so I don't know where you got that. And as I mentioned, I have NOT sat at lights holding my foot on brakes, and do not use improper braking techniques. Also, I definitely do NOT do late hard braking. Do you work for Power Stop? lol.
So what is going on with your brakes that you think there is a problem? Runout issues I think only occur if you've had the rotors turned. If you think they were manufactured wrong, get a micrometer and measure the rotor thickness across the surface.
 

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I've warped my share of rotors over the years and I started a technique that has stopped warping. When I come to a stop, no matter the braking, I find the sweet spot of pedal force and keeping the car from creeping forward. This keeps the least amount of pressure on the rotors. I also allow the car to creep forward a few inches every few seconds or so, this will allow the heat of the pads to dissipate over the entire rotor.
This is great and a good technique! Once you realize and accept that operator error causes this issue, you can start changing your braking habits to correct. Most people do not want to admit that something they did could possibly have caused the issue. They take it as a personal insult to their driving abilities. Truth is, most people are not taught proper braking techniques. But once you get over yourself and correct your braking technique, the problem goes away. And just for the record, your brakes were never warped (it is technically not possible to warp a brake rotor), they simply had pad material transferred unevenly onto the rotor surface.

My wife used to do this all the time with our big, heavy Expedition. I fixed it when it got bad enough by bedding the breaks again on a mile long stretch of road by getting up to around 45-50 and repeatedly braking very hard but never coming to a complete stop. You need to get the breaks good and hot and I mean you need to smell the brakes or they are not hot enough. Takes about 15 minutes total but I always got them back to perfect. Then repeat every 4-6 months when they got bad again.
 

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This is great and a good technique! Once you realize and accept that operator error causes this issue, you can start changing your braking habits to correct. Most people do not want to admit that something they did could possibly have caused the issue. They take it as a personal insult to their driving abilities. Truth is, most people are not taught proper braking techniques. But once you get over yourself and correct your braking technique, the problem goes away. And just for the record, your brakes were never warped (it is technically not possible to warp a brake rotor), they simply had pad material transferred unevenly onto the rotor surface.

My wife used to do this all the time with our big, heavy Expedition. I fixed it when it got bad enough by bedding the breaks again on a mile long stretch of road by getting up to around 45-50 and repeatedly braking very hard but never coming to a complete stop. You need to get the breaks good and hot and I mean you need to smell the brakes or they are not hot enough. Takes about 15 minutes total but I always got them back to perfect. Then repeat every 4-6 months when they got bad again.
Have to disagree with you about not being able to wasp rotors. I warped the rotors on my grand am when I was stationed in Germany in the early 90's. Did everything wrong while coming off the autobahn. I quickly discovered something was wrong. Got back to K-town and took the front wheels off, you could physically see the bend in the rotors. Just understand, I was driving a car over a 100mph on non ventilated rotors that were barely adequate for 55mph.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
 

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I've warped my share of rotors over the years and I started a technique that has stopped warping. When I come to a stop, no matter the braking, I find the sweet spot of pedal force and keeping the car from creeping forward. This keeps the least amount of pressure on the rotors. I also allow the car to creep forward a few inches every few seconds or so, this will allow the heat of the pads to dissipate over the entire rotor.
Same here. Sometimes I will pop the car in neutral when I'm sitting level, but don't do this all the time or I'll wear out the shifter.

Seems we don't have a consensus whether we may use "warped" or not.

I may seem a little defensive. It's because I don't want to spend alot of time defending how I drive. I am not an amateur driver e.g. a 15 year old girl with a learners permit. Some here make it seem that if you use the brakes at all, you are going to ruin them. I have uneven thickness on at least one rotor and mine are quite new. I know that everything from installation to burnishing, along with driving techniques were done properly by qualified people and not idiots. I don't how to prove it to you. It's just frustrating to keep being told you did something wrong while also dealing with the frustration of just having spent a bunch of money on new parts and labor. I'm in touch with Power Stop looking to get some satisfaction. I do believe they make a good product, but that it's also possible that they may turn out a defective one or two occasionally.
 

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Have to disagree with you about not being able to wasp rotors. I warped the rotors on my grand am when I was stationed in Germany in the early 90's. Did everything wrong while coming off the autobahn. I quickly discovered something was wrong. Got back to K-town and took the front wheels off, you could physically see the bend in the rotors. Just understand, I was driving a car over a 100mph on non ventilated rotors that were barely adequate for 55mph.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
I decided to just concede instead of argue and use term "runout". Part of the frustration.
 

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So what is going on with your brakes that you think there is a problem? Runout issues I think only occur if you've had the rotors turned. If you think they were manufactured wrong, get a micrometer and measure the rotor thickness across the surface.
Done, uneven.
 

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I put a set of AutoZone Duralast Gold rotors (high carbon content/ black coated) rotors on my wife's Chrysler 200 and had a lot of trouble with them until I finally figured out that they were not sitting flush on the hub. The black coating was applied unevenly on the inside of the rotor...They must have sprayed them while hanging up and the coating must have run down and settled at the bottom because it was 1/8" thick in a 1.5" spot. I scraped then sanded it off the surface that mates to the hub and the problem was solved.
 

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I decided to just concede instead of argue and use term "runout". Part of the frustration.
Conceding isn't the issue. It isn't my opinion that you can't warp a rotor, it is scientific fact. Look it up.

Anyway - If this has happened to multiple rotors on the same car I would start to suspect other components like maybe a bent hub, bad piston, defective caliper, etc. I'm not sure if you were saying you have had this issue with all of your rotors on that car. Certainly it could be a manufacturing defect. I would think the maker would (and should) simply send you a new part. If it happened again, then maybe they might push back.
 

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Conceding isn't the issue. It isn't my opinion that you can't warp a rotor, it is scientific fact. Look it up.

Anyway - If this has happened to multiple rotors on the same car I would start to suspect other components like maybe a bent hub, bad piston, defective caliper, etc. I'm not sure if you were saying you have had this issue with all of your rotors on that car. Certainly it could be a manufacturing defect. I would think the maker would (and should) simply send you a new part. If it happened again, then maybe they might push back.
Have not had problem all along. Working with manufacturer. I don't need to look up fact or not fact, because I'm with you on warped rotors. It's other experts here that say it's a myth, so I decided to concede so that we could get back on topic a little bit, and discuss whether anyone else has received defective Power Stop parts.
 
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