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How long(far) is everyone getting on the stock pads on an R/T? My 2012 has 125K on it and when I had it in for a oil change, I asked them to check the brakes and give me an estimate on cost to replace the pads and front rotors as I've been getting a vibration when braking. They told me the pads were fine and had plenty of life left. I certainly don't want to pay for something I don't need, but at nearly 8 years and 125K I'm shocked the pads are still so good. Other than the squeaking(which they've done off and on since probably 50K) and the aforementioned vibration when braking lightly, they work fine. I'm just amazed as I've never had a car go much beyond 50K or so without needing at least front pads. My driving is a good mix of highway and city so I use the brakes pretty frequently. Just curious is this is typical life on these cars? If so, I'm impressed!
 

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My driving is mostly highway and flat so I'm able to squeeze a lot of miles from brakes on the family cars. I usually get 70,000 to 90,000 miles on a set of front brakes. And I often dont even touch the rears by the time I offload the car around 130,000 miles.

When I worked, the brakes on the work car lasted anywhere from 12,000 to 15,000 miles. The rotors were warped and the pads were glazed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Damn...I'm impressed!

I'm on my third set of pads and rotors now..75000 miles, lol.
Yeah that sounds like my typical experience with other cars I've had, granted most of them were GM so that might explain the multiple brake pad changes needed! My front rotors do need replacing and after the quote they gave me at the dealer, I'll be doing those myself! Since I'll have the wheels off, I'll probably go ahead and change out the front pads while I'm in there anyway. Hey, if these got me 125K then it might be 250K before they are needed again.
 

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How long(far) is everyone getting on the stock pads on an R/T? My 2012 has 125K on it and when I had it in for a oil change, I asked them to check the brakes and give me an estimate on cost to replace the pads and front rotors as I've been getting a vibration when braking. They told me the pads were fine and had plenty of life left. I certainly don't want to pay for something I don't need, but at nearly 8 years and 125K I'm shocked the pads are still so good. Other than the squeaking(which they've done off and on since probably 50K) and the aforementioned vibration when braking lightly, they work fine. I'm just amazed as I've never had a car go much beyond 50K or so without needing at least front pads. My driving is a good mix of highway and city so I use the brakes pretty frequently. Just curious is this is typical life on these cars? If so, I'm impressed!
Sounds like you are relatively easy in your brakes, not unheard of to get that much life from brake pads in such a scenario.

However, at some point, you probably executed a prolonged, extended braking episode (coming to a stop at a traffic light from highway speeds) and left the brakes engaged while sitting stopped. That cooked one or both of the rotors in the spots where the pads were holding, and that is felt as vibration now when applying the brakes.

The brakes’ ability to do their job is still there, but the vibration can be unpleasant, often increasingly so. The only thing you can do is replace the front rotor(s). Might as well do the pads since it’s best not to run old pads on new rotors, and might as replace both front rotors since everything else will be new up front.

New pads and 2 new new rotors can be purchased for relatively little money nowadays and put on in the garage in an hour or two. If paying someone else, the cost will obviously be more, but if that’s what you have to do, that’s what you have to do.

Either way, the vibration won’t go away on its own and will likely only get more pronounced as the miles stack up.
 

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'14 R/T with 145K km, still on first set of pads, rotors haven't been replaced. Looks like no issues yet.
I admit, that prefer rarely to use the brakes and brake gradually with multiple touches, and use hard full brake, when immediate stop required.
Could it be that stock brake pads on these cars are very good and durable, unlike replacements or they are the same?
 

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Lol. I read 145 and overlooked its km, not miles. I caught myself before asking if you extend brake life by driving through red lights and stop signs.
 

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Lol. I read 145 and overlooked its km, not miles. I caught myself before asking if you extend brake life by driving through red lights and stop signs.
Yeah.. LOL.. I specified KM, knowing that majority here use Miles.
I think in my neighborhood, where basically all the people obey the rules, only I am do full stop on "STOP" signs, and others just "gliding very slowly", pretending or thinking that they did stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sounds like you are relatively easy in your brakes, not unheard of to get that much life from brake pads in such a scenario.

However, at some point, you probably executed a prolonged, extended braking episode (coming to a stop at a traffic light from highway speeds) and left the brakes engaged while sitting stopped. That cooked one or both of the rotors in the spots where the pads were holding, and that is felt as vibration now when applying the brakes.

The brakes’ ability to do their job is still there, but the vibration can be unpleasant, often increasingly so. The only thing you can do is replace the front rotor(s). Might as well do the pads since it’s best not to run old pads on new rotors, and might as replace both front rotors since everything else will be new up front.

New pads and 2 new new rotors can be purchased for relatively little money nowadays and put on in the garage in an hour or two. If paying someone else, the cost will obviously be more, but if that’s what you have to do, that’s what you have to do.

Either way, the vibration won’t go away on its own and will likely only get more pronounced as the miles stack up.
I do try to go easy on the brakes but have had way more than one "oh s***" moments where I've had to lay into the brakes hard. I guess I was just surprised with the mileage considering my driving style with other cars was similar and I never got anywhere near that long on pads. But taking a look at the size of the rotors and calipers on this thing, I'm starting to understand why. They are huge! On the front at least. I'll probably deal with the vibration until warmer weather than spend an afternoon in the garage replacing the front rotors and probably do the pads while I've got the wheels off.
 

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I do try to go easy on the brakes but have had way more than one "oh s***" moments where I've had to lay into the brakes hard. I guess I was just surprised with the mileage considering my driving style with other cars was similar and I never got anywhere near that long on pads. But taking a look at the size of the rotors and calipers on this thing, I'm starting to understand why. They are huge! On the front at least. I'll probably deal with the vibration until warmer weather than spend an afternoon in the garage replacing the front rotors and probably do the pads while I've got the wheels off.
Replacing the rotors is not a big deal. You just have to remove the caliper bracket (2x21mm bolts on the backside) and the caliper with it, then the rotors will literally fall off into your hands. If you're already going to be replacing the pads, doing the rotors too is not bad at all.

The main thing I would advise if replacing the rotors is to get some good silicone grease that can take hi-temps for the reassembly of the caliper hardware and such. Keeping all those parts well lubricated (with the right kind of grease) will keep the squeaks and squeals away for many miles to come.
 

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DodgeGuy: I agree with GertFrobe regarding ease of replacing the rotors and the high temp grease.

Its a good practice to replace them when the pads are replaced. I'll just add that the price difference between turning rotors if you are thinking of doing that (if your rotors are solid) vs buying good quality new rotors is go with new rotors. The cost differential between new rotors and turned rotors is minimal, and you eliminate the headaches of turned rotors which is stock loss and tendency to warp sooner.

Always clean the rotors with brake cleaner before installing them, even if they appear dry and free of preservative.
 

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I believe the original poster was
blackRTnTN
however, I know, when it will come time for me to do this replacement, i would be asking or researching same questions: which brands to get, is there "Mopar" branded and they are good....etc. And I feel, that will not have ability to DIY, this is the part that I don't want experiment with.
 

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I believe the original poster was
blackRTnTN
however, I know, when it will come time for me to do this replacement, i would be asking or researching same questions: which brands to get, is there "Mopar" branded and they are good....etc. And I feel, that will not have ability to DIY, this is the part that I don't want experiment with.
I just replaced the front pads, rotors, and calipers on mine yesterday. I should have taken some pics or a short vid of what I did, then I could point you toward that as a reference. It's really not too hard...fairly straightforward, difficult to get wrong really.

The main thing that could be done "wrong" and have adverse consequences would be to not properly (or use the improper) grease the hardware that is meant to move back and forth within the brake assemblies. But even then, about the worst that can happen is the car will sound like a garbage truck when coming to stop, the actual braking performance won't usually suffer (unless you do something truly bad like smear grease all over the rotor surface or pad surface facing the rotors).

As far as brands to buy, that is a nebulous answer that everyone will answer differently. Some will say buy OEM only from the dealership, others will say get the most expensive name brands you can find, and some will say just get whatever you can afford. None are wrong, but none are really right either .

If the car is a daily driver, get whatever you can afford, they'll all work. Local parts stores' house brands are more than capable for a daily driver.

If the car ever sees the track or strip, even just occasionally, you'll be better off going with the high dollar name brand stuff. You'll have to order those parts usually, as no local parts store will stock them for on-the-site purchase. If you're going to order, I'd recommend some place RockAuto or Summit over ordering from a local parts store. They'll be the same parts, but you'll get a bit of a price break by going with an online retailer.

And if you don't want to leave anything to chance, get the parts from the local Dodge dealership's parts department. You know they'll work, just like the original ones did in fact, but you will pay a premium for the OEM parts, so be prepared for that.
 
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