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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone done this? I want to do mine, anyone have a write up or link to the instructions? Thanks in advance!
 

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Just like the tranny, there is a difference between a flush and simply doing a fluid replacement.

A 'flush' is designed to sweep away all fluid and accumulated debris. A fluid exchange is designed to simply replace the old fluid with new.


Which are you trying to do?
 

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Here is what I do....I use a turkey baster and pull as much fluid out of the master cylinder as I can. Then replace that fluid with ATE Blue racing fluid. Now begin bleeding from the farthest rear brake and work towards the closest. At each wheel you are done when you pull in the new fluid...remember to top off before it gets empty. When you have blue in the master and at all four corners you are done.

Then in two years do the same but use the amber fluid.

I have done this with all my cars and never had a brake failure....but most can say the same. However in a panic stop even my 01 neon will out stop most cars because the fluid has very little moisture and does not fade
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just like the tranny, there is a difference between a flush and simply doing a fluid replacement.

A 'flush' is designed to sweep away all fluid and accumulated debris. A fluid exchange is designed to simply replace the old fluid with new.


Which are you trying to do?
I'm wanting to do a flush.





Here is what I do....I use a turkey baster and pull as much fluid out of the master cylinder as I can. Then replace that fluid with ATE Blue racing fluid. Now begin bleeding from the farthest rear brake and work towards the closest. At each wheel you are done when you pull in the new fluid...remember to top off before it gets empty. When you have blue in the master and at all four corners you are done.

Then in two years do the same but use the amber fluid.

I have done this with all my cars and never had a brake failure....but most can say the same. However in a panic stop even my 01 neon will out stop most cars because the fluid has very little moisture and does not fade
Where do I get this ATE Blue Racing fluid?
 

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I do this every 2-3 years in my cars. Protects internals of brake components, and maintains stopping power of the vehicle.

Just like the other posters, suck out as much as you can from the reservoir, and then bleed from each caliper starting furthest away from the master and working your way closer until the fluid coming out is clean. Make sure you keep topping off the reservoir as getting air in the master cylinder will make for a very bad day.
 

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Yep, did it the same way the first month I got my SRT, fluid out of the master, bleed all starting at right rear (farthest from master)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I haven't done it since I got the car 4 years ago. So it's time. Also have some shaking so I'm going to replace the rotors. Brake pads still got meat but I'm guessing the surface might be crystallized because I get like rotor to metal sound after driving in stop and go traffic.
 

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Man i need someone to help me do mine. And where do i get that blue racing fluid
 

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I'm wanting to do a flush.
What everyone has been describing is actually not a flush, but rather a fluid replacement. A flush uses low pressure to pump new fluid through the master cylinder to all 4 wheels at the same time, flushing out any trapped air and debris.

The techniques described above won't dislodge debris nor remove small air bubbles trapped in the system since it uses the pedal to pump small amounts of fluid at a time rather than a continuous flow that sweeps the system clean.
 

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What everyone has been describing is actually not a flush, but rather a fluid replacement. A flush uses low pressure to pump new fluid through the master cylinder to all 4 wheels at the same time, flushing out any trapped air and debris.

The techniques described above won't dislodge debris nor remove small air bubbles trapped in the system since it uses the pedal to pump small amounts of fluid at a time rather than a continuous flow that sweeps the system clean.
Wrong.. I purchased a do it yourself hand pump to suck the fluid out of the calipers. Gets all of the air out, and you can keep sucking it out until you're pumping new fluid out through the caliper.
 

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Wrong.. I purchased a do it yourself hand pump to suck the fluid out of the calipers. Gets all of the air out, and you can keep sucking it out until you're pumping new fluid out through the caliper.
Like I said, continuous flow. Pushing or pulling doesn't matter and the direction it flows is irrelevant. There are reverse flow systems on the market that are aviation style that do the same thing. In the end, it's the continuous flow that is the difference between a fluid flush and a fluid replacement.

You can replace the water in your toilet bowl by pouring one cup of water at a time into it. But flushing dumps 1.8 gallons into it all at once in a continuous flow.

One removes the contents of the bowl effectively but the other doesn't.
 

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Like I said, continuous flow. Pushing or pulling doesn't matter and the direction it flows is irrelevant. There are reverse flow system on the market that are aviation style that do the same thing. In the end, it's the continuous flow that is the difference between a fluid flush and a fluid replacement.

You can replace the water in your toilet bowl by pouring one cup of water at a time into it. But flushing dumps 1.8 gallons into it all at once in a continuous flow.

One removes the contents of the bowl effectively but the other doesn't.
I just have to say, well said. :clap:
 
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I'm just wondering, what kind of contaminants find their way into the brake fluid? It's a sealed system... I really can't see there being any crap that gets in the system other than moisture obviously.
 

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I'm just wondering, what kind of contaminants find their way into the brake fluid? It's a sealed system... I really can't see there being any crap that gets in the system other than moisture obviously.
Well, if it were truly sealed moisture couldn't get in and you wouldn't ever need to replace it.

There is coagulated degraded chemical goo from the repeated heating of the brake fluid breaking down and polymerizing the fluid, small pieces that have soughed off of the seals in the system by mechanical action, oxidized surface material from the lines, micro-air bubble from super heated hot spots in the fluid from braking and pressure application and release (cavitation).

The system is sealed to a degree but it is also subjected to extreme temperature and pressure changes that cause reactions to occur within the fluid, on the surface of the components and mechanical wear from movement of the plunger seals in the master cylinder and calipers.

Sealed does not mean static.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well I got my issue resolved. Pumped a little fluid out and noticed it was still clear and in good shape. So I didn't do the flush or replace. I got new rotors, new brake pads (ceramic). Had to replace them even though they were about half way worn. There was deep cracks in the pads themselves. Vibrations are gone. But that new brake pad smell stinks.
 

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I typically do a lazy mans flush of brake fluid at about 4-5 yrs if I plan on keeping the vehicle longer.
It takes a little more brake fluid but doesn't require pulling wheels and bleeding the brakes. Somehow my time has become more important than OCD vehicle maint that I used to be guilty of!
I'll replace the brake fluid in the master cyl several times over the course of weeks. Replace it once, drive it for a week or whatever, repeat 3-4 more times.

You can see that the new brake fluid mixes with the old as it gets darker after you use the brakes a bunch of times. Not sure how much of the total capacity is in the mc but the fluid gets progressively clearer with each fluid swap and it only takes about 5 min each time.
Considering the number of vehicles that get NO brake fluid maint and don't have issues for many years, including my 40 yr old Jeep with 4 wheel drum brakes thAt I can guarantee hasn't seen any brake love in at least 20 years, I figure this method is way better than nothing at all and it's uick and easy. Probably takes twice as much brake fluid, I dunno.
If one assumes that re filling the master cyl is 50% of the capacity, 5 drain and re fills gets you about 95% replacement.
 
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