Charger Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

Found a video which raises an interesting question....what's the best way to handle a traffic stop.

Lets say you are 10-15mph over (20km/h). I know the cop has full discretion and power during a traffic stop. And my cop buddies always say that a little courtesy and a positive attitude go a long way.

But my lawyer friend always tells me to keep my mouth shut, and swallow the ticket first, because it's easier to discuss mitigating factors and such in the courtroom.

What has your experience been like guys?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
Kindness goes along way. Attitude, and unpleasantness are never wise in that scenario. Unless one keeps their crap in order, it's easier to talk your way into more trouble, than out of it. In some cases, a citation will be issued no matter what. When/if it gets to court, assuming you can't just pay it out, the prosecutor/judge will be more likely to have some compassion if the officer's report does not say you were hard to get along with.
The place to contest a citation is in court, not on the side of the road.

YMMV

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
In many states 20 over is a reckless driving offense.

Lawyers will typically tell you to keep it zipped and take the ticket or ride. They have to make a living too. In some cases keeping a mouth shut is showing courtesy, especially for wise alecks.

In any case expect a ticket going 20 over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Kindness goes along way. Attitude, and unpleasantness are never wise in that scenario. Unless one keeps their crap in order, it's easier to talk your way into more trouble, than out of it. In some cases, a citation will be issued no matter what. When/if it gets to court, assuming you can't just pay it out, the prosecutor/judge will be more likely to have some compassion if the officer's report does not say you were hard to get along with.
The place to contest a citation is in court, not on the side of the road.

YMMV

Don
So if the cop asks "Why do you think I pulled you over today", is it better to fess up and hope to earn brownie points with the cop? Or is it better to keep mouth shut, and play it out by the lawyer's playbook? (and perhaps antagonize yourself with the cop)

I've got a cop friend who tells me that here in my city, local patrol units are expected to issue 150 traffic citations/equipment violations per year, but its a very soft quota a lot of discretion is used. However, if you get caught by the traffic units, you are done, because these guys often literally come to work amped up to write tickets. (and it's their designated job).....My cop buddy doesn't like being asked too many cop questions, and he gives very "cop" answers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Just got pulled over last weekend for "cross a gore" (yup, I had to look that up as well). It was on the Interstate. I was at the speed limit and then slowed down to let traffic pass and used my blinker. But I did get over too late. Highway Patrol was right behind me. In that case I figured why deny anything and why not just admit to what we both knew I did. There was no way to get around it. He gave me a warning. So that worked out. However, if I was pulled over for speeding, something I might stand a chance to fight I've given it a lot of thought. I'd be nice but not admit to anything. "Do you know why I pulled you over". I'd perhaps say no, but I have no doubt it was for a good reason. Perhaps if the officer said I was pulled over for going 80 in a 65 I'd say something like, I don't think i was going that fast but I'm certainly not going to disagree with you. Things that can easily be argued later on if needed. The video says not to say anything. What they really mean is don't say anything that can be used against you. Good advice but as I mentioned above, sometimes it might just be better off agreeing. As when it is so obvious it does not matter.

I drive a fast car and I go over the speed limit every now and then. But I've probably been pulled over 3 times in the past 15 years. I think a big reason is that I have developed good driving habits. Always use my turn signal, seldom drive at excessive speeds, come to a complete stop, etc. I do those things without even thinking. That probably covers 95% of my driving. So I'm pretty safe 95% of the time and only "endanger" about 5% (probably 4% of that is on ramps!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
Crossing a gore. Not many people know what that painted cross hatched zone is called. And very rare to get a ticket for violating a Gore.


However, its very easy to get a gore violation turned into aggressive driving if making an abrupt last second freeway exit and driving through one and ending up cutting in front of another driver.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
@ Silent:
Sadly, not all departments are not created equal. Some are more motivated by generating funds for their city council, mayor, etc. Others are more about enforcing the spirit of the law versus the letter. The lawyers will tell you to clam up. You can still be cordial, and not admit to any wrong doing. We all have the right to not incriminate ourselves.

I know that quotas exist in some places. I do not agree with such a policy. This type of crap comes down from admin folks who ride desks, and want numbers to justify one thing or another to their superiors.

Over my career, I found that most folks appreciate being advised why they are being stopped up front, as opposed to playing the "do you know" game. I will always recall the time I stopped a young man for speed, and when I walked up the drivers window, I told him so. I followed up by asking if he had any reason to be going so fast? His reply was, "No, I really don't, just stupid I guess." We both had a good laugh about that, and I thanked him for being brutally honest. His driving record was pretty good, so I advised him to be careful, an sent him on his way.

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
So if the cop asks "Why do you think I pulled you over today", is it better to fess up and hope to earn brownie points with the cop? Or is it better to keep mouth shut, and play it out by the lawyer's playbook? (and perhaps antagonize yourself with the cop)
At 15+ over you now exactly why you are being pulled over and so does he. He didn't just out of the blue decide today was your day and see what you'd confess to. Just man up and own it.

By acting dumb or saying I have no idea just insults his intelligence which pretty much guarantees a ticket for everything you got popped for. By being cool and owning it he can respect that and that's when the break comes either a warning or lesser violation usually without points. You can still get the hard-core guy but 99% of the time they'll work with you



Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
In my experience, a cop has made up their mind to ticket you 99% of the time as soon as the stop occurs.
Your job is to try to change their mind, & again in my experience good luck...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
“Best way to handle a traffic stop for speeding?”

Be polite, apologetic and maybe learn from the experience and don’t do it again wether you get the ticket or not. YOU know you were violating traffic code and that is what matters so don’t be surprised when you get stopped and get a ticket. :) Sometimes being honest and apologetic can get you a warning.

Yes, a Buzzkillington reply but that’s my opinion. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
If an officer asks you any questions about what you were doing or why and you answer them you just confessed and trust me that goes in his ticket notes. So if you try to go to court he just says you admitted it at the time of stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Usually just admit my wrong doing and sometimes they let you go sometimes you get booked.

I usually go over the speed limit accepting I put myself at risk of a ticket. Dunno why people can't own their actions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
However, its very easy to get a gore violation turned into aggressive driving if making an abrupt last second freeway exit and driving through one and ending up cutting in front of another driver.
I could see that. In my case I had my blinker on, let a couple of cars pass while I slowed down and then "slid" on over to the exit. He came up to my window and introduced himself. I just flat out told him I understood why he pulled me over, as I had exited way too late. He asked me where I was going. I said, if I knew that I would not have exited so fast. I was using a new app, Turnout (which SUCKS) and it changed the route at the last moment. I just told him I was using an app, I did not tell him what app. While I've practiced not admitting to things like speeding, in this case I went with total honesty as he was right there when I did it. Probably about 500 feet behind me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Always helps to know some local LEOs and drop names. :D If you're not fortunate enough to be able to do that, however, then honestly being polite and courteous does go the furthest. Usually when they ask I'll say "I must have taken my attention away from my speed for a minute, because when I saw the lights on behind me I looked down and noticed that I may have been going a little faster than I thought."

"Good afternoon, officer", and "not a problem", and "thank you", tend to go a long way, too. If it's dark out, I always turn on my interior lights, as well. Side window tint is basically illegal (rear windows are an argument, at best) here in NY, so no need to roll anything down, but if I were somewhere where dark tint was legal, rolling that down so that they have full view of the interior of the car, and keeping my hands at 10 and 2 are also courtesy things, as far as I'm concerned. Makes their job less eventful, and I think most of them will tell you that is what they hope every stop is. They sometimes remember that and can send messages to the person that will decide your fate in court to reduce it to parking tickets, etc. depending on how your state operates.

"Funny" comments are a bit of a risk, but my aunt once got a warning on a speeding ticket in the middle of the night because, when she was asked "do you know why I pulled you over?", she replied "Bald tires, officer?" Something he clearly could not have seen or known in the middle of the night and at that speed. Gave a chuckle, told her to slow down, and sent her on her way. Not saying that it would ever work for anyone else, but we still get laugh out of that story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
As a former LEO, I can tell you that attitude is everything.
Not only has a good attitude changed my mind on writing someone up but it has also gotten ME out of a few AFTER and BEFORE I wore the badge.I always had the window down, license, registration and insurance in hand and both hands on the wheel. You never know what the officer had to deal with on the previous call or stop. He could be fresh on and be relaxed and having a good day or he could be in a bad mood and just want to ruins someone else's day. It happens.
As others have already said, being a little apologetic will help..."Yeah, I was kind of on autopilot and wasn't watching the speedo but where I was going.".yadda yadda yadda.
Don't blame someone or something else...just accept it is was you.
I have even pulled over before the office came up behind me knowing I was busted. Never got a ticket those times either.

And now for a recent story.....
About 2 months ago, I was zipping along on my way home doing about 78 in a 65 on the interstate.:whistle::whistle: As I am passing over a cross street, I look over and on the on-ramp is a Statie... I see brakes lights come on then the quick flash of the backup lights meaning he just put his cruiser in drive. I figured I am busted so I switch over 3 lanes and pull far right on the shoulder (I also like to give them room to get out of traffic when stopped.)
He walked up to my window and I offered up my info, he looked at them and asked if everything was OK. I said yes...Just figured I was clocked speeding and pulled over when I saw his brake and backup lights activate. He asked how fast I was going and I told him ..."When I looked down, 74" He said "I can write you a ticket if you want." No I'm good thanks! And off I go.
Apparently he was just checking as to why I pulled over. *Insert DOH here. 🙄🙄🙄
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
My experience has been that if I'm stopped for speeding and the wife is in the car ... no ticket ... just a warning. I have been stopped by myself at over 20 MPH. I got a ticket but the officer wrote the speed as 15 MPH over the limit. That's a gift in itself. When I did get a ticket I just sent the paperwork and a check in the mail. For some reason the speeding tickets never showed up in my insurance records or as points against my driver's license.
I was riding with a friend once when he was pulled over in a speed trap (officer parked on the overhead bridge who was calling to the officers further down the road). The officer who waved us over said he could give my friend a speeding ticket that would be expensive or a cheaper ticket if he answered "no" to the following question ... "are you wearing your seat belt?" All of us in the car were wearing our seat belt but my friend answered the question with "no". The officer said he would be back and went to his cruiser. He came back and handed my friend a ticket for not wearing a seat belt.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,336 Posts
My experience has been that if I'm stopped for speeding and the wife is in the car ... no ticket ... just a warning. I have been stopped by myself at over 20 MPH. I got a ticket but the officer wrote the speed as 15 MPH . . . . . .
Try this next time when stopped at 20 over and it might get you off. It works for me when the wife is not in the car. Tell him you were speeding because your wife ran off with a cop and you thought he was bringing her back.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top