Charger Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2006 R/T was manufactured in September 2005 and I took delivery of it in September 2005 as well. Next month my car will be nine years old and I still have the original battery. There are no signs of its demise at this point.

Am I just lucky or have others' batteries lasted this long as well? I have never had a car battery last anywhere near this long. Four years max.

Over the last nine years I have sat in the car at lunch time playing the radio for 45 minutes for most of the cars life. I would think this would be hurtful to the battery but it does not seem to have hurt it at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
I was worried like you towards the end when I traded my '07 Charger. She was 6 yrs old then and still on the original battery. I started carrying my jump-it in the trunk as I figured I was on "borrowed tine" with the original battery. You're at 9 years now... that's impressive.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,199 Posts
A lot depends on other factors. Where do you live? Temp extremes can make a big difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
A lot depends on other factors. Where do you live? Temp extremes can make a big difference.

The difference temp extremes can affect the battery to the negative I assume. I live in San Diego where it's 72 degrees every day of the year. However, I have lived here for 30 years and have never had a battery last this long so something else is contributing to this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,199 Posts
Well, have any of your other cars had a battery in the trunk? That's a huge help right there. The engine bay is a baaaaad place for a battery. Vibration, shock, temps near the engine at or over 200 degrees, all contribute.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,450 Posts
Battery life also depends on the number of charge/discharge cycles. How many miles on your car and how far do you drive it when you start it each time?

The radio doesn't really draw much power so it doesn't make the discharge very deep unless you play it at a loud volume for very long periods of time. Also, when you are at ideal year-round temp, the power draw from starting is at a nice steady low level as opposed to trying to star at 20° F for 4 months of the year.

Modern battery technology has improved rapidly in the past 15 years and the Mopar batteries are very good.

Factors contribution to longevity include temperature fluctuation over the life of the battery, vibration, depth of discharge before recharge and total charging cycles.

So far you have 2 of those in your favor with where you live and where the battery is located in the car. Fill in the details on the other two and you may have your answer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,632 Posts
There's a whole thread about who is still on their original 2006 battery:
http://www.chargerforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147537

Personally, I changed mine a couple years ago as a preventive measure and peace of mind. No sense in pushing it and getting stranded somewhere. The Mopar batteries really are good but they seem to fail without warning.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,450 Posts
There's a whole thread about who is still on their original 2006 battery:
http://www.chargerforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147537

Personally, I changed mine a couple years ago as a preventive measure and peace of mind. No sense in pushing it and getting stranded somewhere. The Mopar batteries really are good but they seem to fail without warning.
Very true. When mine failed, it was without warning and on a cold snowy morning in February when conditions were at their worst and I was trying to get to work. I jumped it and went straight to Sears to get a new Die Hard Gold AGM installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Battery life also depends on the number of charge/discharge cycles. How many miles on your car and how far do you drive it when you start it each time?

The radio doesn't really draw much power so it doesn't make the discharge very deep unless you play it at a loud volume for very long periods of time. Also, when you are at ideal year-round temp, the power draw from starting is at a nice steady low level as opposed to trying to star at 20° F for 4 months of the year.

Modern battery technology has improved rapidly in the past 15 years and the Mopar batteries are very good.

Factors contribution to longevity include temperature fluctuation over the life of the battery, vibration, depth of discharge before recharge and total charging cycles.

So far you have 2 of those in your favor with where you live and where the battery is located in the car. Fill in the details on the other two and you may have your answer.
I have 137,000 miles on the car. My daily commute is ten miles each way but with traffic that takes about 20 minutes. I would say most of my driving of this car are short trips with the occasional long trip.

My 2010 Audi also has the battery in the trunk, which I agree is a huge benefit, and that battery only lasted four years. This car sits more without being driven however.

I'm really attempting to compare apples to apples with other Charger owners to see if this is common for these cars.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,450 Posts
I have 137,000 miles on the car. My daily commute is ten miles each way but with traffic that takes about 20 minutes. I would say most of my driving of this car are short trips with the occasional long trip.

My 2010 Audi also has the battery in the trunk, which I agree is a huge benefit, and that battery only lasted four years. This car sits more without being driven however.

I'm really attempting to compare apples to apples with other Charger owners to see if this is common for these cars.
Many are still running their original battery. Read this thread that mnunes posted...

http://www.chargerforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147537
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
There's a whole thread about who is still on their original 2006 battery:
http://www.chargerforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=147537

Personally, I changed mine a couple years ago as a preventive measure and peace of mind. No sense in pushing it and getting stranded somewhere. The Mopar batteries really are good but they seem to fail without warning.
Well this answers my question. Seems like it is quite common for the first model year of the Charger to still have the original battery. I wonder how long it will last!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,450 Posts
I have 137,000 miles on the car. My daily commute is ten miles each way but with traffic that takes about 20 minutes. I would say most of my driving of this car are short trips with the occasional long trip.

My 2010 Audi also has the battery in the trunk, which I agree is a huge benefit, and that battery only lasted four years. This car sits more without being driven however.

I'm really attempting to compare apples to apples with other Charger owners to see if this is common for these cars.
Also, with 100 miles per week of daily commuting (20 miles per day x 5), you must be making a LOT of long trips to get 137K miles in 10 years. Your daily commute would only account for about 6K miles per year or less than half of the total miles on your vehicle.

Even with double that weekly, you would still need to make a lot of long trips to get that many miles.

I have 103K miles on my '06 purchased new in Feb '06 and driven daily on a 45-50 mile round trip commute with a few long trips thrown in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Also, with 100 miles per week of daily commuting (20 miles per day x 5), you must be making a LOT of long trips to get 137K miles in 10 years. Your daily commute would only account for about 6K miles per year or less than half of the total miles on your vehicle.

Even with double that weekly, you would still need to make a lot of long trips to get that many miles.

I have 103K miles on my '06 purchased new in Feb '06 and driven daily on a 45-50 mile round trip commute with a few long trips thrown in.
We are both mathematical. My average for nine years and 137,000 miles is 42 miles per day. 20 of those miles are weekday commute miles, the rest are other short trips with the occasional long trip added in. Sometimes I have to go back to the grocery store after coming from there because I forgot something!
 

·
Premium Member
2017 Dodge Charger R/T
Joined
·
2,504 Posts
At this point, it is anyone's guess as to how much longer it will last!

Depending on how much longer you plan on keeping the car, you might consider replacing it soon!

You definitely don't want to get stranded soon! :banana:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
At this point, it is anyone's guess as to how much longer it will last!

Depending on how much longer you plan on keeping the car, you might consider replacing it soon!

You definitely don't want to get stranded soon! :banana:
This is very sensible advice. However, I am more interested to see how long it will last than I am concerned about being stranded. It's just me, most would replace it I'd guess.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,199 Posts
I think, like in my case, most give signs they are on the way out they dont just go dead all of a sudden. Every now and then, it'll take a few cranks to get it going, odd ball indications, that sort of thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I just hit 9 years with mine. Daily driver in Nebraska so big temp changes. I think I'll be changing it out since the dealer sent a coupon for new 84 month battery for $89 and I checked the negative cable has quite a bit of corrosion build up on the terminal so it probably won't last through another Nebraska winter.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top