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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
*Long Post Warning*

So last night Miss Foxxxy and I go to my neighbor’s house for a few drinks, and he has another couple there that we’ve never met before. The guys’ wife has a cool phone, and I’m checking it out, and make a comment about how nice it is, but she says she hates it; it’s too big. So I show her my new Motorola KRZR, and she’s gushing over it. Then she flips it open and makes a comment about the wallpaper, which is a picture of my car, done very nicely by Matt (elcobra44) Check it out here.

So she says “That’s a cool picture. What kind of car is that?” and Miss Foxxxy says “That’s our car. It’s a Dodge Charger R/T.” So the woman says “Oh, you should talk to my hubby. He loves Dodge Cars”.

Then it starts:

I said to him “Oh, you’re a Mopar guy?” and he says “Yeah, but I hate these cars of today; they’re too slow.” And I said “Well, I think mine is pretty quick; it does the quarter mile in about 14.5 seconds and zero-to-sixty in about 5.5 seconds. :D

He says “Well my 1969 Super Bee did the quarter mile in 12 seconds.”

Me: “Really, did it have the 440?”

Him: “No, 383.”

Me: “Wow, you did the ¼ mile in 12 seconds with the 383 Magnum? What was the horsepower rating on that engine?”

Him: “335 Horsepower”

Me: “Was it modified?”

Him: “Nope, stock. Well, actually I had headers on it. But that was it. Otherwise it was stock.”

Me: “Well my car has 350 Horsepower, and there’s no way it can do the ¼ mile in 12 seconds, even the super bee can’t do that.”

Him: “Yeah, well you don’t have a HEMI in that thing, and my car only weighed 3,000lbs, and I had a slapstick, and your car doesn’t have a real slapstick…”

...and blah blah yadda yadda. The silliness went on for about half an hour at least. Half what this guy said was pure B.S. Zero to sixty times in 3.5 to 4 seconds (first he said 2 seconds), burning rubber in every gear. You name it; he said it.

Then he was trying to tell me the cubic inch displacement of my 5.7L HEMI is 360. I told him it was 345. No, it’s 360. Bah. It’s my car; I know what it has. Even my neighbor said to him: “I’m pretty sure Jimmy knows what his car has under the hood. He’s very into his car and spends all his time on Charger Forums. He knows that car.” The guy wouldn’t shut up, so finally I just capitulated. “I guess maybe I do have a 360 c.i.d. Whatever”.

Where do these guys come from?

I hate big talkers. “My car this” and “My car that” blah blah yadda yadda.

Hey, guess what Fonzy? That was 35 years ago, and I couldn’t help but notice that you’re currently driving a rusted out, dented base model 2003 PONTIAC SUNFIRE.

I think it’s time to stop living in (and embellishing) the “Glory Days”.

/rant off

-=FLEX=-
 

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I had a guy at work SWEAR up and down that I only had 4.8lt V8..... I never got him to understand the 5.7 part of MY car. I just kicked his ass in a race l8r and he stopped:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hate Know-it-alls. So what does a 69 SuperBee run?
I dunno. Been trying to find out. Can't find any stats. Anyone know?

But I seriosuly doubt it could do 12 seconds stock.

And I also seriously doubt it did 0-60 under 4 seconds.

:knockout:

Puh-Leeze!
 

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The guy's full of it. 440 Six Pack's, Hemi's, LS6 Chevelle's, RA IV GTOs, etc, all broke 12s with "good" tires and a full performance "tune", back in "the day" 383-powered, full-size Mopars were 14-second cars, period. If a 383 was "tuned", with a set of headers and used good tires it would still be a 13-second ride at best. The only way that guy's story could be true, is that he bought the car used, and sombody swaped out the 383 for a "built" 440 and the guy couldn't tell the difference (small machined pad right by the distributor), so he didn't know. He's so far off about his understanding of the current cars and displacements, it wouldn't be to hard to believe.

Since the '68-'69 Super Bee and Road Runner are the exact same car, just one Dodge and one Plymouth.
Here's a clip from something I found on the net;
1968 Plymouth Road Runner

Engine Data

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1968 Plymouth Road Runner Engines Options:
383 V8 335 hp @ 5200 rpm, 425 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 hp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.

Performance:
383/335 hp: 0-60 in 7.1 sec, 1/4 mile in 15.0 sec @ 96mph.
426/425 hp: 0-60 in 5.3 sec, 1/4 mile in 13.55 sec @ 105mph.


General Information

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1968 Plymouth Road Runner Production:
2D Pillared Coupe: 29,240 produced
2D Hardtop Coupe: 15,359 produced


Plymouth went back to the basics when they created the 1968 Road Runner. After deciding that muscle cars had gotten away from their original purpose of being fast affordable thrills, Plymouth paid Warner Brothers $50,000 to affix the ”road runner” cartoon bird onto its new vehicle, which was based on a stripped Belvedere, thus in 1968 the Road Runner was born. The standard engine was none other than MOPAR's tried and true 383 power-plant V8, included the heads, manifolds, camshafts, crankcase windage tray, and valve springs from the race ready 440 Magnum. The new Road Runner was also equipped with heavier duty suspension, manual transmission, and numerous other performance pieces. Comfort was basic with no carpeting - just rubber floor mats and a bench seat. Mopar performance seekers were pleased with the new addition, as the base price started at just $2896 and for just $714 more the Hemi 426 could be had.

1968 Plymouth Road Runner Production:
2D Pillared Coupe: 29,240
2D Hardtop Coupe: 15,359

Engines Options:
383 V8 335 hp @ 5200 rpm, 425 lb-ft @ 3400 rpm.
426 Hemi V8 425 hp @ 5000 rpm, 490 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm.

Performance:
383/335 hp: 0-60 in 7.1 sec, 1/4 mile in 15.0 sec @ 96mph.
426/425 hp: 0-60 in 5.3 sec, 1/4 mile in 13.55 sec @ 105mph.
 

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Flex, there is NO way to deal with someone like this.

The ONLY solution (sadly) is to pick the people you hang out with.
 

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Super Bee Heritage:

The original Super Bee was based on the Dodge Coronet. It was a 2-door model only and was produced from 1968 through 1970. It was the company's low-priced muscle car, the equivalent of the Plymouth Road Runner, and was priced at $3,027. Although it was available with the Hemi engine, this option raised the price by 33% and only 125 were sold. The 1968 model only came as a 2-door coupe and 2 engine options, the base 335 hp 383 Magnum, and the 426 Hemi rated at 425 hp.

The Super Bee included a heavy-duty suspension, an optional Mopar A-833 four-speed manual transmission, and high-performance tires. Outside, a stripe (with the bee logo) was wrapped around the tail.

A hardtop version joined the existing pillared coupe body for 1969, and the induction was now a "Ramcharger" cold-air intake. A "six-pack" (three two-barrel carburetors) version of Dodge's 440 in³ engine was added to the offering list mid-year. This option fell half-way between the standard engine and the Hemi as a $463 option. The 1969 model year gave Chrysler customers several engines to choose from. The base 383hp (high performance), 440 Six Pack, and the 426 Hemi. The 440 Magnum (4bbl) was not an available option, and was reserved for the Coronet R/T. In 1970 the Super Bee was given a new front end that consisted of a dual ovaled grill that Dodge PR referred to as "bumble bee wings". This new look turned off many buyers and the sales plummeted for the year. Despite the new looks the engines as well as the "ramcharger" hood carried over from 1969. Also in 1970, Dodge produced 4 concept Superbee convertibles. The where-abouts of these 4 cars are unknown.

Engines:

1968-1970 - 383 in³ (6.3 L) Big-Block V8, 335 hp (250 kW)
1968-1970 - 426 in³ (7.0 L) Hemi V8, 425 hp (317 kW)
1969-1970 - 440 in³ (7.2 L) Big-Block V8, 390 hp (291 kW)
Production:

1968 - 7,842 - 7,717 (383), 125 (426 Hemi)
1969 - 27,800 - 25,727 (383), 1,907 (440 Six Pack), 166 (426 Hemi)
1970 - 15,506

[edit] 1971
Since the 1971 Coronet was only available in sedan and station wagon versions, the Super Bee model was moved to the Charger platform. Since the Charger already had an R/T muscle car version, the Super Bee was slotted in as the low-priced entry in the line at US$3,271. 5,054 were produced which includes the 22 with the Hemi engine.

The moniker was discontinued until the 2007 Super Bee, which was a Charger SRT-8.

1971 was the first and only year the a small block engine (340 4-bbl) became available in the Super Bee.

Although the 440 Magnum (4-bbl) was not an available option on the Super Bee for 1971, 26 are known to have been built. With that option of the 440 the Super Bee could walk all over any Ford, Chevy, or GM product on the market

Engines:

1971 - 340 in³ (5.6 L) Small-Block V8, 275 hp (205 kW)
1971 - 383 in³ (6.3 L) Big-Block V8, 300 hp (224 kW)
1971 - 440 in³ (7.2 L) Big-Block V8, 370 hp (275 kW)
1971 - 440 in³ (7.2 L) Big-Block V8, 385 hp (287 kW)
1971 - 426 in³ (7.0 L) Hemi V8, 425 hp (317 kW)



Charger Heritage:

In 1969 not much was changed for the popular Charger. Exterior changes included a new grille with a center divider and new longitudinal taillights both designed by Harvey J. Winn. A new trim line called the Special Edition (SE) was added. This could be available by itself or packaged with the R/T, thus making an R/T-SE. The SE added leather inserts to the front seats only, chrome rocker moldings, a wood grain steering wheel and wood grain inserts on the instrument panel. A sunroof was added to the option list as well, and it would prove to be a very rare option (some 260 sold). The bumble bee stripes returned as well, but were changed slightly. Instead of four stripes it now featured one huge stripe framed by two smaller stripes. In the middle of the stripe an R/T cutout was placed. If the stripe was deleted, then a metal R/T emblem was placed where the R/T cutout was. Total production dropped slightly to around 85,680 units. But in 1969 Dodge had its eye on NASCAR and in order to compete it would have to create two of the most rare and desirable of all Chargers: Charger 500, and the Charger Daytona.

The television series The Dukes of Hazzard (1979-1985) featured a 1969 Dodge Charger that was named The General Lee, often noted as being the most recognizable car in the world. "The General" sported the Confederate battle flag painted on the roof and the words "GENERAL LEE" over each door. The windows were always open, as the doors were welded shut. The number "01" is painted on both doors. Also, when the horn button was pressed, it played the first 12 notes from the de facto Confederate States anthem "Dixie's Land". The muscle car performed spectacular jumps in almost every episode, and the show's popularity produced a surge of interest in the car. The show itself purchased hundreds of Chargers for stunts, as they generally destroyed at least one car per episode. (Real Chargers stopped being used for jumps at the end of the show's sixth season, and were begrudgingly replaced with miniatures.)


[edit] Charger 500
In 1969, in order to help Dodge battle Ford/Mercury in NASCAR, two special Chargers were built. The regular production Charger wasn't aerodynamic enough to compete with the Ford Torino/Mercury Cyclone. The first year for the Charger 500 was 1969. This car looked like a standard Charger, except that the rear buttress was filled in, and a flush-mounted 1968 Coronet grille was used with exposed headlights. The rear bumble bee stripes would also have a "500" cutout which would help to identify this new Charger. These changes would help the car aerodynamically. Only 503 copies were built to abide with NASCAR rules--hence the name "Charger 500". The only engine choices were the standard 440 Magnum or the 426 Hemi. Only 67 Charger 500s were built with the Hemi.

Despite all of the new changes, Ford/Mercury continued to beat the Chargers. Dodge did not stand idly by. They went back into the wind tunnel and unleashed a new Charger that changed everything.


[edit] Charger Daytona
NASCAR in 1969 stipulated that any car raced in their series had to be available for sale and must build a minimum of five hundred for the general public. Since the Charger 500 was not fast enough, Dodge went back into the wind tunnel and created one of the most outrageous and most sought after Chargers, the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona.

The Daytona used a pointed nose piece that added 18 inches (457 mm) into the front of the car. This gave the car the down-force that the engineers were looking for, but the rear end still tended to lift at speed. To solve this, they mounted a large wing over the trunk lid which would give the Charger Daytona and its sister car, the 1970 Plymouth Superbird, the nickname of "wing cars". The wing was 23 inches (584 mm) tall so that the trunk could be opened without hitting the bottom of the wing. Fenders and a hood from the upcoming 1970 Charger were used on the Daytona. Rear facing scoops were added to the front fenders, above the tires, which added an aerodynamic advantage. It was widely believed at the time that they were only used to help with tire rub in hard corners. In fact, they relieved the high pressure that would build up in the fender well at high speed.

Only 503 Charger Daytonas were built with either 440 Magnum or 426 Hemi power. All Daytonas wore red, black, or white bumble stripes that bore the name "Daytona" in the middle of the stripe. The wings were painted the same color as the stripes. The "wing cars" would prove to be so fast and dominating that NASCAR effectively outlawed them for the 1971 season, as a new regulation was introduced that restricted all "aero" cars to a maximum engine displacement of 5.0 L (305 in³), down from the previous 7.0 L (426 in³).
 

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Just as a reference...

I have a '73 Cuda with a 383. The car body is basically stock. At the time, it had 27" tall DOT slicks and 3.91 gears. The transmission is a 727 with 3500 rpm stall converter. The engine has been bored 0.030" with TRW flat top pistons. I found a set of 1967 440 heads (casting #915) to get the higher flow runners AND small combustion chamber. I estimate the compression ratio to be about 10.2:1. The camshaft is a Mopar Performance 0.509", 292deg advertized duration with hydraulic lifters. On top, I have a Mopar Performance M1 intake manifold and Holley 950HP carb. Fresh air comes from a 440-6 style hood scoop with hood isolater to make sure it always gets outside air. All the gasses exit through headers and 3" exhaust.

So...it is not stock by any means, but it is not wild crazy either. My best time ever in the car is 12.37s @ 110 mph...in very good air I might add. Since then, I've added weight via a roll-bar installation. It will run 12.70 all day long. I hope to pick up a bit this year, I changed to 4.30 gears and am going to run 29" tall radial slicks. The combo should maintain the same final drive ratio, but have a better contact patch and less rolling friction...as I can now run about 20 psi in the rears.

Right now it will outrun my stock SRT8, but only has it beat by about 0.5-0.6s. However, what I absolutely love about it is that I can go beat on it all day long and not worry about breaking something.

Keith

PS: The car weighs 3950# with me in it. I'm shifting at 5500 rpm...so it is actually being babied. The engine also has 588 passes on it w/o a refresh.
 

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Just as a reference...

I have a '73 Cuda with a 383. The car body is basically stock. At the time, it had 27" tall DOT slicks and 3.91 gears. The transmission is a 727 with 3500 rpm stall converter. The engine has been bored 0.030" with TRW flat top pistons. I found a set of 1967 440 heads (casting #915) to get the higher flow runners AND small combustion chamber. I estimate the compression ratio to be about 10.2:1. The camshaft is a Mopar Performance 0.509", 292deg advertized duration with hydraulic lifters. On top, I have a Mopar Performance M1 intake manifold and Holley 950HP carb. Fresh air comes from a 440-6 style hood scoop with hood isolater to make sure it always gets outside air. All the gasses exit through headers and 3" exhaust.

So...it is not stock by any means, but it is not wild crazy either. My best time ever in the car is 12.37s @ 110 mph...in very good air I might add. Since then, I've added weight via a roll-bar installation. It will run 12.70 all day long. I hope to pick up a bit this year, I changed to 4.30 gears and am going to run 29" tall radial slicks. The combo should maintain the same final drive ratio, but have a better contact patch and less rolling friction...as I can now run about 20 psi in the rears.

Right now it will outrun my stock SRT8, but only has it beat by about 0.5-0.6s. However, what I absolutely love about it is that I can go beat on it all day long and not worry about breaking something.

Keith

PS: The car weighs 3950# with me in it. I'm shifting at 5500 rpm...so it is actually being babied. The engine also has 588 passes on it w/o a refresh.

Keith, awesome car, and combo (I can't believe an E-body can be that heavy, short of a 440, or HEMI convert. lol of course I'm not doubting you, just stating my amazement.) I don't know if you agreeing with the fact of a full-weight, stock (short of headers) 383 Super Bee being able to run 12s, or not, as stated in the point of this post. But, you'd have to admit your combo is far from such a stock B-body, previously mentioned, and you're in the 12s now. Did you ever run the car with the "stock" 383?
 

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Keith, awesome car, and combo (I can't believe an E-body can be that heavy, short of a 440, or HEMI convert. lol of course I'm not doubting you, just stating my amazement.) I don't know if you agreeing with the fact of a full-weight, stock (short of headers) 383 Super Bee being able to run 12s, or not, as stated in the point of this post. But, you'd have to admit your combo is far from such a stock B-body, previously mentioned, and you're in the 12s now. Did you ever run the car with the "stock" 383?
Yup...it is that heavy...I weigh about 220. I usually run with a full tank of gas also...for added traction. When I checked the weight, it was at a good facility where they were running Stock and Super Stock races that required a good weight. So, I'm pretty confident the weight is correct.

Right, I did mention above that mine is was not stock. As far as the stock 383, no I haven't ran one myself. It would be impossible for a stock 383 to run 12s in my car...weighing 3950#. I'd say the lightest the B-body could be would be around 3300-3400#. I'd say it should run around 13.5 at best with a stock 383...with 335 hp. In my car, the same stock 383 would run around 14.3 or so.

Keith
 

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Ah ha ha ha...memories.

When I was in high school, back in Bethlehem PA, I had a 440 RoadRunner.........TANK!!! That car was the biggest/heaviest beast I ever drove. But it was very very nice. Hemi orange with the roadrunner cartoon going down the side.

That car was soooooo slow that every small block Nova in town would woop my butt.

Everyone loved my car but they all considered it a slow pig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
LOL...shoulda just laughed and say oh, nice....after about 10 oh, nices...he would get the point :D
Oh man. Not this guy. He just kept going on and on and on. It was like pulling the string on one of those talking dolls. No way to make it stop once it gets going.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

And I forgot about the part where he said it's not a real Charger because it has 4 doors. :bored:
 

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All I know is I made one of my co-workers scream like a little girl when he asked if my car was fast on the way to work. I just floored it as soon as he said that, and about 4,500 RPMs in first gear he started screaming and didn't stop till I let off the gas.
 

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Don't laugh off old old musclecars just because they're old. What they give up in modern performance technology they gain back in light weight and gearing. My 69 Dart weighs 3300ish and runs 14.3 @99MPH with a 3.23 one wheel peel. It is a 46K original mile car and as absolutely dead nuts stock as it gets. The ONLY deviation from 1969 stockness are the 205-70-14 turd all season radials on it. And thankfully, my 69 Dart doesn't have HAL constsantly trying to save me from myself. But I'm still going to buy a new Daytona too. They drive SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO nice.
 

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Oh man. Not this guy. He just kept going on and on and on. It was like pulling the string on one of those talking dolls. No way to make it stop once it gets going.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

And I forgot about the part where he said it's not a real Charger because it has 4 doors. :bored:
he is just jelious he dsnt have 1 in sexy black...or at all
 

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69 super bee weighed alot
the charger in the movie bullit was a r\t and had the same specs as the new r\t
 
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