Charger Forums banner

1 - 20 of 162 Posts

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Back in October, CE9311 posted about the failure of his camshaft and wanted to know what was the cause.

I contacted him and asked him to send us the camshaft and all lifters for an Assay.

An Assay is testing of a metal or ore to determine its ingredients and quality. Basically, we wanted to find out was it a soft camshaft and components or was it a lubricant failure like I believed based on the pictures?

In this case, since we work with many racers and Steve Walsh builds many race engines for our customers, I contacted Steve of Steve's Machine Shop Service and asked him if we sent him the components, could he determine what caused the failures?

Since he builds so many engines for racers and is really independent of any dog in the fight, I figured he could give an unbiased opinion and get us some answers. Was it a soft camshaft? Was it lubricant failure or was it something else? He was also interested in this assay because he does work with police vehicles too for the government and the fact that CE9311 has a pursuit, he was willing to scientifically determine what it was.

We got the camshaft from CE9311 only on the promise to figure what happened, not destroy anything and then get all the parts back to him for sentimental reasons. We agreed and I sent it directly to Steve via Fedex. He did the assay and sent me a letter on the findings along with some pictures.

Well, here is the result. Since it was never posted, I am posting it now for everyone to see.



Steve used a New Age Industries Multi Range Portable Metal Hardness Tester on the camshaft and components.



In multiple place measurements on the camshaft showed a hardness of 56 to 57 Rockwell. This means that Chrysler didn't make a bad or soft part.



Same with the other components.

One thing Steve has said in the past is that many people lie about all kinds of subjects but metal NEVER lies. If it is blue in color then the metal got hot. If it isn't blue then it is not a heat issue and is something else.

He finished the assay and sent the parts back to CE9311.

He sent me these pictures and a letter about his findings. He also reminded me who he is and why he is specifically qualified to render a cogent result.

I talked to him recently and he said that CE9311 now has had time to digest the information and I am allowed to share this with the rest of you.





In the end, it is not parts failure but lubricant failure like we surmised in the beginning. ;)

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,469 Posts
This is a perfect example of a helpful and informative posting without the egregious salesmanship.

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,083 Posts
Interesting read for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,083 Posts
So I guess one question that raises is does the factory recommend Pennzoil have the same problems or is it just that most 5w20s just don't hold up? (I'm still using quantum blue until Brian tells me I can't have any more)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
758 Posts
"...the failure was gradual over a long period of time."

This gives the impression that the damage was spread out over multiple OCIs, which lines up with what I had previously envisioned as well. However, I can think of at least one instance of a similar failure (on a Challenger) where it was much more sudden. The owner in question mentioned the damage occurring so quickly that he noticed it was running rough one morning on the way to work, and before he could make it home, it died and wouldn't run again. Now, in his case, I know they ID'd the lifter freezing as the problem - it froze and ate the cam up. Do we know if the same thing occurred here?

The reason I remember that Challenger owner's story over many others I've heard is that I previously believe keeping an eye on thing via UOAs would be sufficient to catch any failure before it got to the failed point. However, the Challenger owner corrected me with his story, as he had been doing exactly that (getting regular UOAs), yet his failed in the middle of an OCI, and so he never had a chance to see it coming.

Just one more data point to add to the story...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
758 Posts
So I guess one question that raises is does the factory recommend Pennzoil have the same problems or is it just that most 5w20s just don't hold up? (I'm still using quantum blue until Brian tells me I can't have any more)
While the majority of the failures has occurred on the 5.7L (and thus likely under the watch of a typical 5W-20 engine oil), there have been several 6.xL engines that lost the cam as well. And those would have ostensibly been fed a diet of 0w-40 synthetic their entire lives before chewing up the cam. Maybe it's not so much what kind/weight oil that is used but the proper flow to the cam lobes in question? I don't know, just spitballing here...
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
So I guess one question that raises is does the factory recommend Pennzoil have the same problems or is it just that most 5w20s just don't hold up? (I'm still using quantum blue until Brian tells me I can't have any more)
I had a long discussion with Steve Walsh after he sent the letter to me about this. His contention is that the need for fuel economy has overshadowed the content of quality in the oil because the oil product has to flow fast and shear quickly to attain pumping like water. This is how they can increase CAFE to contribute in meeting it but also qualify to make more trucks. An engineer at one of the Big 3 told me "we don't want cars lasting much longer than the payments do.....typically 5 years......because we need the customer to buy another vehicle. We don't design them to last much beyond that. If we did, it would be 20 years before they would buy another one and we wouldn't be in business the next time they wanted another car!


This application doesn't have excessive spring pressure as he mentioned also. So the volume of oil was NOT in question as there was copious flow. What was indicated was.....in my own words....too thin a molecule, inability to force rolling of the lifter and internal failure from a poor oil design. Since there is NO warranty on oils, they can get away with this.

One of the operative words he used in his letter was "stiction". This characteristic forces the rolling stock to roll and precludes it from sliding on the surface. This is the flat spotting that I have talked about constantly in my oil threads.

The fact that Mopar/FCA has taken their warranty from 5 years/100,000 miles to 5 years/60,000 miles is a great indication of where they see operational life. If you use 13,476 miles driven on average per customer per year, that gets you through the warranty in 4.45 years.

UOA is only partly informative because the amount of wear indicated in iron/steel would not be sufficient to raise suspicion of immanent failure until you heard the sounds....ticking and ultimate misfire in the cylinders due to camshaft ramp/noise degradation. By that time, it is way too late.

Frankly, it is the ILSAC GF-5 and API-SN spec'd oils that are the major culprit regardless of viscosity. Viscosity is NOT FILM STRENGTH and doesn't inform the user of the content in the oil. Enacted October 2010 for the 2011 model year. You never saw camshaft failures in engines before this spec was introduced. Molecule structure/design is important as it will either allow suspension of the anti-wear, anti-scuff and anti-rust compounds or it will relinquish it's additives into the pan and not promote stiction and proceed to a long term regimen of eventual failure which culminates in a quick event like on the Challenger.

I have posted failure pictures of Craig H's 6.1L Hemi V8 with a billet steel camshaft using Pennzoil Platinum 0w40 on the forum many times. He stated to me that he was using it for up to 9,000 miles thinking that it was ok like our QB.

$3,800.00 later he got a bigger cam, refreshed heads, and new internal upper components and will now only call us for his lubricants.

It is a wholesale abandonment of longevity by the oil industry that I hope more people on this forum will not participate in. It sounds like participate in sales all the time, it is rather a warning to stop buying into the price of a lubricant oil change but instead consider the quality of the oil change vs. the price.;)

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
While the majority of the failures has occurred on the 5.7L (and thus likely under the watch of a typical 5W-20 engine oil), there have been several 6.xL engines that lost the cam as well. And those would have ostensibly been fed a diet of 0w-40 synthetic their entire lives before chewing up the cam. Maybe it's not so much what kind/weight oil that is used but the proper flow to the cam lobes in question? I don't know, just spitballing here...
I have seen failures on all in the block camshafts in the Hemi engine regardless of displacement. As I said it is not volume of oil but quality of oil that is adding up to be the issue. Depositing large amounts of zinc and especially phosphorus as a last resort protection mechanism protects the surface of the metals in a boundry lubricity fashion. This is why you see 3,000 - 7,000 ppm phosphorous in our oil blends.

We get all the 0w engines over to a 7.5w40 and make a large molecule which suspends the additives and then load it up with zinc, phosphorous and magnesium. This ensures lack of failure in these engines. :bigthumb:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,233 Posts
We get all the 0w engines over to a 7.5w40 and make a large molecule which suspends the additives and then load it up with zinc, phosphorous and magnesium. This ensures lack of failure in these engines.
Would having the heavier cold weighted oil @ 7.5w vs a 0w function/lubricate/protect differently in extreme cold temperatures of -15C and below?

Although I still run QB oil currently, its been a question that I've been pondering on for quite sometime.
I read in one of the Audi or vdub forums that having higher oil pressure does not equal more lubrication...maybe its all in my head but I feel like my oil pressure 'seems' to remain higher (until it hits 75C) for a bit longer vs when I used to use the Pennzoil 5W20 Pureplus oil.

Just curious, is all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
We get all the 0w engines over to a 7.5w40 and make a large molecule which suspends the additives and then load it up with zinc, phosphorous and magnesium. This ensures lack of failure in these engines. :bigthumb:
Though I agree these additives will help with wear and tear on a motor by adding these protections to oil. There's no disputing that. However, there's an issue with motors that consume oil due to age that it has the possibility of coating the catalytic converters and causing them to fail. Motors that that don't consume a lot of oil would fair out better with their converters, but over time, their converters could fail from burning these additives. So there's a trade off of motor protection and passing a smog test/throwing codes.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Would having the heavier cold weighted oil @ 7.5w vs a 0w function/lubricate/protect differently in extreme cold temperatures of -15C and below?

Very good question. The 7.5w is good to -27.2 C and -17 to -19 F without any issues at all. The only time we take it down below the 7.5 is in Alaska where we will get it to the 5 or even 2.5 where it is 60 below F or -51 C. In every other part of the country including most all of Canada, we really don't need to go any less than the 7.5. Like where you are in Toronto and surrounding it is 18 C today.

Although I still run QB oil currently, its been a question that I've been pondering on for quite sometime.
I read in one of the Audi or vdub forums that having higher oil pressure does not equal more lubrication...maybe its all in my head but I feel like my oil pressure 'seems' to remain higher (until it hits 75C) for a bit longer vs when I used to use the Pennzoil 5W20 Pureplus oil.

There is less thinners and thickers compounds in the formula you are using presently so it stays pretty consistent through the temperature ranges. The 5w20 Pennzoil has more solvents in it and acidic compounds we don't like so we don't use them. Viscosity isn't film strength but it is the bearing between the pressurized parts. The passive parts are lubricated simply with film and additives we put in the formulate.

Just curious, is all
Nothing to worry about POWERMAN. You are good. When I did your blend, I researched the last 5 years of temperatures before we blended your particular oil. :bigthumb:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Though I agree these additives will help with wear and tear on a motor by adding these protections to oil. There's no disputing that. However, there's an issue with motors that consume oil due to age that it has the possibility of coating the catalytic converters and causing them to fail. Motors that that don't consume a lot of oil would fair out better with their converters, but over time, their converters could fail from burning these additives. So there's a trade off of motor protection and passing a smog test/throwing codes.
That is one of the first questions we always get about our oils especially when a customer gets an oil analysis and sees the numbers on the sheet. All the oils made today are made with acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds where our QuantumBlue Lubricants are unique in that they are neutral based so they don't affect the oxygen sensors or the converters like acidic oils do. This is another reason people can use our materials for so long in very high mileage vehicles and not affect the emission systems. :bigthumb:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
That is one of the first questions we always get about our oils especially when a customer gets an oil analysis and sees the numbers on the sheet. All the oils made today are made with acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds where our QuantumBlue Lubricants are unique in that they are neutral based so they don't affect the oxygen sensors or the converters like acidic oils do. This is another reason people can use our materials for so long in very high mileage vehicles and not affect the emission systems. :bigthumb:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!

Catalyst poisoning occurs when the catalytic converter is exposed to exhaust containing substances that coat the working surfaces, so that they cannot contact and react with the exhaust. The most notable contaminant is lead, so vehicles equipped with catalytic converters can run only on unleaded fuel. Other common catalyst poisons include sulfur, manganese (originating primarily from the gasoline additive MMT), and silicon, which can enter the exhaust stream if the engine has a leak that allows coolant into the combustion chamber. Phosphorus is another catalyst contaminant. Although phosphorus is no longer used in gasoline, it (and zinc, another low-level catalyst contaminant) was until recently widely used in engine oil antiwear additives such as zinc dithiophosphate (ZDDP). Beginning in 2004, a limit of phosphorus concentration in engine oils was adopted in the API SM and ILSAC GF-4 specifications.

Depending on the contaminant, catalyst poisoning can sometimes be reversed by running the engine under a very heavy load for an extended period of time. The increased exhaust temperature can sometimes vaporize or sublimate the contaminant, removing it from the catalytic surface. However, removal of lead deposits in this manner is usually not possible because of lead's high boiling point.

Any condition that causes abnormally high levels of unburned hydrocarbons—raw or partially burnt fuel—to reach the converter will tend to significantly elevate its temperature, bringing the risk of a meltdown of the substrate and resultant catalytic deactivation and severe exhaust restriction. Usually the upstream components of the exhaust system (manifold/header assembly and associated clamps susceptible to rust/corrosion and/or fatigue e.g. the exhaust manifold splintering after repeated heat cycling), ignition system e.g. coil packs and/or primary ignition components (e.g. distributor cap, wires, ignition coil and spark plugs) and/or damaged fuel system components (fuel injectors, fuel pressure regulator, and associated sensors) - since 2006 ethanol has been used frequently with fuel blends where fuel system components which are not ethanol compatible can damage a catalytic converter - this also includes using a thicker oil viscosity not recommended by the manufacturer (especially with ZDDP content - this includes "high mileage" blends regardless if its conventional or synthetic oil), oil and/or coolant leaks (e.g. blown head gasket inclusive of engine overheating). Vehicles equipped with OBD-II diagnostic systems are designed to alert the driver to a misfire condition by means of illuminating the "check engine" light on the dashboard, or flashing it if the current misfire conditions are severe enough to potentially damage the catalytic converter.

Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalytic_converter

====================================

Questions I have:

What non-acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds do you use?

Who developed these non-acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds?

What data do you have supporting your claim that they don't harm the catalytic converter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Not posted? I am sure I retyped relevant info. Thread was about the failure, which he wrote three, maybe four paragraphs about and I condensed into one. I felt no need to re type out his whole autobiography on how he became space shuttle pilot.

If this was oil formula based then every Hemi would face these problems.
If it was MDS issue then why is Cylinder 5 a non MDS cylinder seemingly the culprit?
If this was an idle issue then why are there plenty of Ram, Challenger, and civilian Chargers with same issues and some Pursuit models with 5K idle hours fine?

Steve failed to write about the roller pins, and needle bearings, any reason why some are effected and some are not. (specially how failed lifter bearings showed almost corrosive type wear on them and non failed bearings were fine)and where there may be insight in what he wrote (specifically spring pressure). This was not the in depth I expected. I felt like I was reading another sales pitch for oil. That type of background to flaunt for several paragraphs and not mention some blatant physical attributes seen on the parts is what really disappointed me.

Also point out that Steve's Machine Shop Service has little to no internet front or info on it. One info has two reviews on gogle a 4 year old could write and 2 different address. On Two addresses you can find show nothing in an industrialized area and one or both of them wanna say is way out the country with a house and larger garage (impressive and lots $$ to get 3 phase out here for all the machinery that would be ran). One with the largelegit looking garage isn't the one even listed on the letter front. Every machine shop I have every used past 5 years has reviews, directions, and photos of them. There was a website in construction phase with that same logo oddly around the time you sent me the letter but has since disappeared as well. Odd. And lastly, most importantly I personally felt the way he wrote it is entirely to perfectly a match for your style including use of key words. I may not be a space-shuttle f-22.2 aeronautical expert PHD holder Steven Hawkins second cousin but I have spent many hours in machine shops, racing shops, aircraft maintenance hangers and never hear that kind of verbiage used to describe failure. Even when Oil was involved.

I kept this to myself but seeing that you want to post this as a fact to tell all why they fail from ONE test/experiment I felt I should present my own thoughts. I will not saying anything more on this regardless of any rebuttals. Do as you wish. I will from this point not engage with you any further.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Not posted? I am sure I retyped relevant info. Thread was about the failure, which he wrote three, maybe four paragraphs about and I condensed into one. I felt no need to re type out his whole autobiography on how he became space shuttle pilot.

If this was oil formula based then every Hemi would face these problems.
If it was MDS issue then why is Cylinder 5 a non MDS cylinder seemingly the culprit?
If this was an idle issue then why are there plenty of Ram, Challenger, and civilian Chargers with same issues and some Pursuit models with 5K idle hours fine?

Steve failed to write about the roller pins, and needle bearings, any reason why some are effected and some are not. (specially how failed lifter bearings showed almost corrosive type wear on them and non failed bearings were fine)and where there may be insight in what he wrote (specifically spring pressure). This was not the in depth I expected. I felt like I was reading another sales pitch for oil. That type of background to flaunt for several paragraphs and not mention some blatant physical attributes seen on the parts is what really disappointed me.

Also point out that Steve's Machine Shop Service has little to no internet front or info on it. One info has two reviews on gogle a 4 year old could write and 2 different address. On Two addresses you can find show nothing in an industrialized area and one or both of them wanna say is way out the country with a house and larger garage (impressive and lots $$ to get 3 phase out here for all the machinery that would be ran). One with the largelegit looking garage isn't the one even listed on the letter front. Every machine shop I have every used past 5 years has reviews, directions, and photos of them. There was a website in construction phase with that same logo oddly around the time you sent me the letter but has since disappeared as well. Odd. And lastly, most importantly I personally felt the way he wrote it is entirely to perfectly a match for your style including use of key words. I may not be a space-shuttle f-22.2 aeronautical expert PHD holder Steven Hawkins second cousin but I have spent many hours in machine shops, racing shops, aircraft maintenance hangers and never hear that kind of verbiage used to describe failure. Even when Oil was involved.

I kept this to myself but seeing that you want to post this as a fact to tell all why they fail from ONE test/experiment I felt I should present my own thoughts. I will not saying anything more on this regardless of any rebuttals. Do as you wish. I will from this point not engage with you any further.
I think what the letter was trying to say was that the quality of oil and the lack of 'friction' due to friction modifiers not being present caused the lifter roller assembly not to rotate due to spring pressures. Being that the MDS lifter is deactivated, the roller somehow doesn't get enough pressure to the roller to roll due to the lack of friction from slick oil??? This seems kind of hokey to me. That roller is designed to rotate. It still rides the lobe. There has to be some sort of contact with it to rotate and not stay still, and I'm not sure that 'slick oil with no friction modifiers' would just cause it to just stop spinning. There's a lot of information and holes here. I too suspect a sales pitch.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Catalyst poisoning occurs when the catalytic converter is exposed to exhaust containing substances that coat the working surfaces, so that they cannot contact and react with the exhaust. The most notable contaminant is lead, so vehicles equipped with catalytic converters can run only on unleaded fuel. Other common catalyst poisons include sulfur, manganese (originating primarily from the gasoline additive MMT), and silicon, which can enter the exhaust stream if the engine has a leak that allows coolant into the combustion chamber. Phosphorus is another catalyst contaminant. Although phosphorus is no longer used in gasoline, it (and zinc, another low-level catalyst contaminant) was until recently widely used in engine oil antiwear additives such as zinc dithiophosphate (ZDDP). Beginning in 2004, a limit of phosphorus concentration in engine oils was adopted in the API SM and ILSAC GF-4 specifications.

Depending on the contaminant, catalyst poisoning can sometimes be reversed by running the engine under a very heavy load for an extended period of time. The increased exhaust temperature can sometimes vaporize or sublimate the contaminant, removing it from the catalytic surface. However, removal of lead deposits in this manner is usually not possible because of lead's high boiling point.

Any condition that causes abnormally high levels of unburned hydrocarbons—raw or partially burnt fuel—to reach the converter will tend to significantly elevate its temperature, bringing the risk of a meltdown of the substrate and resultant catalytic deactivation and severe exhaust restriction. Usually the upstream components of the exhaust system (manifold/header assembly and associated clamps susceptible to rust/corrosion and/or fatigue e.g. the exhaust manifold splintering after repeated heat cycling), ignition system e.g. coil packs and/or primary ignition components (e.g. distributor cap, wires, ignition coil and spark plugs) and/or damaged fuel system components (fuel injectors, fuel pressure regulator, and associated sensors) - since 2006 ethanol has been used frequently with fuel blends where fuel system components which are not ethanol compatible can damage a catalytic converter - this also includes using a thicker oil viscosity not recommended by the manufacturer (especially with ZDDP content - this includes "high mileage" blends regardless if its conventional or synthetic oil), oil and/or coolant leaks (e.g. blown head gasket inclusive of engine overheating). Vehicles equipped with OBD-II diagnostic systems are designed to alert the driver to a misfire condition by means of illuminating the "check engine" light on the dashboard, or flashing it if the current misfire conditions are severe enough to potentially damage the catalytic converter.

Source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalytic_converter

====================================

Questions I have:

What non-acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds do you use?

We purchase our raw materials from both Lubrizol and from Univar to make our neutral co***ounds.

Who developed these non-acidic based zinc and phosphorous compounds?

I developed them during the time that converter damage was occurring from early 90s. I wanted to keep the postitive properties of the zinc and phosphorous without the damage to components.
perfected it by 2000 which is when I started this company and went out on my own 19 years ago.


What data do you have supporting your claim that they don't harm the catalytic converter?
100,000,000 customer driven miles and zero failures on any emission components.

If our customers all experienced catalytic converter issues, there would be tens of thousands of people complaining about this issue and there isn't.;)

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Not posted? I am sure I retyped relevant info. Thread was about the failure, which he wrote three, maybe four paragraphs about and I condensed into one. I felt no need to re type out his whole autobiography on how he became space shuttle pilot.

Here's the thing, why do you feel you needed to redact anything It should have been posted in it's entirety! Steve took the time...for free....to ascertain for you and me what was the case here.

If this was oil formula based then every Hemi would face these problems.
If it was MDS issue then why is Cylinder 5 a non MDS cylinder seemingly the culprit?
If this was an idle issue then why are there plenty of Ram, Challenger, and civilian Chargers with same issues and some Pursuit models with 5K idle hours fine?

There are plenty of Hemi engines that are having this issue. Even non-MDS engines are suffering with the problems. I called it a lubricant failure after seeing the pictures and I got a chance to see the camshaft for myself when you sent it to me. I have 39 years experience in lubrication so it is not simply an opinion of my own. Then Steve took the time to look at it......both the camshaft and all the lifters. You can see one of them in the picture. He checked them all and came up with the same deduction.....lubricant failure. This man has seen thousands of engines of all types from solid lifter, flat tappet, roller as well as filled block engines for racing. He knows his trade performing it for 34 years.

Steve failed to write about the roller pins, and needle bearings, any reason why some are effected and some are not. (specially how failed lifter bearings showed almost corrosive type wear on them and non failed bearings were fine)

The "corrosive" wear was spalling as we discussed and again is lubricant failure under pressure.



and where there may be insight in what he wrote (specifically spring pressure). This was not the in depth I expected. I felt like I was reading another sales pitch for oil. That type of background to flaunt for several paragraphs and not mention some blatant physical attributes seen on the parts is what really disappointed me.

As he said, it was spalling and lubricant failure. The parts were within spec and just below being brittle being 57 rockwell so they weren't soft as originally thought. No blue colors on the metal tells us it isn't a hot starved of lubrication components so the parts had plentiful lubrication. The only thing left in the situation is molecular lubricant failure due to contents and makeup. There isn't anything else to look at!

Also point out that Steve's Machine Shop Service has little to no internet front or info on it. One info has two reviews on gogle a 4 year old could write and 2 different address. On Two addresses you can find show nothing in an industrialized area and one or both of them wanna say is way out the country with a house and larger garage (impressive and lots $$ to get 3 phase out here for all the machinery that would be ran).

One with the large legit looking garage isn't the one even listed on the letter front. Every machine shop I have every used past 5 years has reviews, directions, and photos of them. There was a website in construction phase with that same logo oddly around the time you sent me the letter but has since disappeared as well. Odd. And lastly, most importantly I personally felt the way he wrote it is entirely to perfectly a match for your style including use of key words. I may not be a space-shuttle f-22.2 aeronautical expert PHD holder Steven Hawkins second cousin but I have spent many hours in machine shops, racing shops, aircraft maintenance hangers and never hear that kind of verbiage used to describe failure. Even when Oil was involved.

I don't care if Steve Walsh lives under a bridge, the facts remain that what was discovered by his expertise is what it is. Facts surrounding an issue isn't invalidated by where they were done or whether the person had a $5,000,000 shop or an out building on a property.

I kept this to myself but seeing that you want to post this as a fact to tell all why they fail from ONE test/experiment I felt I should present my own thoughts. I will not saying anything more on this regardless of any rebuttals. Do as you wish. I will from this point not engage with you any further.
That is up to you. I don't see anyone else taking their time to find an answer for you other than simple opinions. I thought I was doing a good thing for you....for free...paying the shipping to Steve and back to you to help ascertain the facts.


Sorry, but those are the facts.:serious:

Regards,
Brian
BND Automotive LLC:driving:
440-821-9040
www.bndautomotive.com
Forum Vendor for 9 years!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Un related questions:
My 2018 has a button where I can see the useful life of the oil.
1.What is the useful oil life point where the oil should be changed?

The windshield sticker mileage and date of oil change (sticker from the dealer) doesn't seem to match,
as my reason for asking this.
------------------------------
2.What is the approximate oil temp that I should have? (another button that can be pushed)

3.What is the approximate oil pressure that I should see from the 3.6 engine with 11,000 miles?

Thanks in advance for the info.
 
1 - 20 of 162 Posts
Top